What does the future hold for designers?

If you’re like me, you’re always questioning what to do next, how you can make a positive impact on the world, and at the same time, run a successful business.

Written by Laura Jane Boast

Designers are visionaries. They thrive on the ability to visualise what the future could or will be like.

As the Founder and Creative Director of an independent print design studio, having a strong sense of perception is paramount. It allows you to outline a clear and defined vision of your future; giving you direction and focus. As visionaries, we must harness this skill.

Starting out my vision lacked focus. Being enthusiastic about lots of areas of design, I was very much multidisciplinary. In fact, working across multiple disciplines has become the general expectation. But I found the varying thought processes required, in order to switch between an array of disciplines to be unnecessarily challenging; constantly having to re-train my way of thinking.

After 10 years in the industry, I believe the future belongs to the specialist.

This is where you’re able to truly become an expert in a neatly defined area — with less choice, comes a greater focus, and a clearer thought process. Being a specialist also opens up more opportunities to collaborate. And for prosperity in the long-term, designers who specialise make it easier for a client to see what unique value and experience they can bring to a project.

So how do you find your specialism?

Firstly, you need to separate what you personally love from what you professionally love. This is difficult because as creatives the areas tend to blur. Begin with an open mind, be curious and question everything you do. Try being more mindful of your own routines and processes. I always carry a notebook. Write down your values, to remind yourself what you do and why you do it.

In conclusion, the future is a place where specialism can flourish. So be brave. Break away from the multidisciplinary expectations and become a specialist.

www.LJBstudio.co.uk

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