Clay Rivers , I’m not religious, but bless you for what you’re trying to do here.
Ré Harris
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Re’-

Sorry, I can’t find the special “e” on my tablet, lol!

I also have depression, but it’s bi-polar disorder. Thankfully I don’t have significant problems with the manic side. My depression is difficult enough by itself.

I’ve been fine for about a year and a 1\2. Bi-polar is a little different than major depression because very specific things can trigger a depressive episode. Lack of adequate sleep over a period of time (several days, up to a week), failure to take meds on a consistent basis, failure to eat properly, and stress. When I say stress, that can mean a lot of things, right? For bi-polar, stress usually means life changes such as getting a new job, moving, going back to college, or oh…… a horrible, unqualified, man being elected to be our next President.

I knew I was going to be upset if he was elected. I never expected it would impact my depression for several days. It sucked. I’m doing better now.

I wish you luck with your depression, Re’. I know how painful and difficult it is to manage the disease. I am 48 and have had depression since I was 18. 30 years. Actually started treatment in 1994, so it wasn’t really bad until then. Well, it was bad. I just didn’t recognize it.

All we can do is live each day as it comes. And know that we are more than our disease. We are stronger than it is. Whatever your depressed brain is telling you at any given moment, you can tell it NO, you are WRONG. You can retrain it to think differently and get yourself out of the negative spiral. It’s a monumental task — you have to catch your brain as it’s in the process of spiraling down. Or when you are in the process of ruminating (repetitive negative thinking). I’m working on this myself. It’s really, really hard. But it’s starting to work. 😊

L