The Day I Learned I Could No Longer Jump (or Learning to Fly)
Jay Armstrong
24221

Hi, Jay,

How are your ears? This is a long shot, but I have developed some unusual expertise about the ears by dealing with “impossible” diagnoses. First, was our son Daniel’s dyslexia. Then, chronic fatigue syndrome in three family members that was so severe in our daughter that she appeared to be dying. Formerly the top performer in her class, she became unable to think, remember, or tolerate any kind of exercise. She was bedridden. Next, the dyslexic became schizophrenic, another “hopeless” diagnosis. Meanwhile the two younger boys (one of whom was the schizophrenic) developed substance addictions. Alcohol and drug addiction — and schizophrenia, even without the complications of addiction — erode the neurons in the left temporal lobe. The brain shrinks in size and weight.

Long story short: all of those problems were cured with the stimulation to the ear provided by gently amplified, high-frequency music. It took a long time for me to figure out this mess. Hope started at The Listening Centre, a Tomatis Method clinic in Toronto, Canada, where Dan’s dyslexia was cured and my CFS was cured. The staff could not explain to me how listening to filtered music through headphones accomplished those healings. Later, my husband’s CFS was helped and our daughter’s CFS was cured within a few days of treatment. However, those healings did not last, either. And when Dan became schizophrenic the clinic would not continue treatment. I had no idea how the various family members with their very different symptoms all could be helped by listening to filtered music. Eventually, I figured that out. As we could not afford to continue with the clinic’s program, I learned that ordinary headphones and ordinary CDs of classical music could effect the same cure as the specialized equipment at the clinic. At length, I cured our son’s schizophrenia. When he relapsed due to his addictions, I cured him again. He struggled with those addictions for the next eight years but kept his left-brain dominance — you see, I had worked out a new paradigm of brain function based on the strength of the stapedius muscle in the right ear. Then, when his brother had a stroke last year, he smoked enough pot to make himself schizophrenic again. I cured him again with the same music therapy.

The ears, especially the right ear, must be able to processes all of the frequencies of sound within the human range accurately and with a fairly consistent volume for the left-brain to dominate the right-brain in their integrative activities. If the left-brain is deprived of normal flows of sound, it cannot direct the integration process. So far, all of my work has emphasized the cochlear function: language and learning. But the vestibular function is equally affected by audio-processing deficits, which is why CFS affects muscle throughout the body and is why schizophrenia (and other forms of so-called “mental” illness) have a slate of physical symptoms along with the cognitive ones.

If you are an athlete, you may have suffered concussions that cumulatively affected your ears. Or you may simply have encountered one of the other dozen or so assaults on the ear that medicine still doesn’t realize affect brain and body functions. You should get a very carefully done audiogram. And then don’t listen to the audiologist who tells you your hearing “is in the range of normal” because some of the most severe forms of illness are caused by such tiny changes in audition that hearing, in the ordinary sense, is not affected. For example, suicidal depression is a condition of “slight” hearing anomalies almost always in the left ear with slight hyperacusis at 2 kiloHertz, a drop in acuity of hearing at 3, 4, and 6 kiloHertz, and a spike upwards at 8 kiloHertz. The French doctor who discovered that hearing curve also cured all of the 233 suicidal patients who came for treatment with his version of the Tomatis Method.

I would not give you false hope, but music therapy done properly might support your condition in several ways. Please get in touch with me for more information if you decide to give music a shot.

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