Business Trip in Beijing

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After being on board for one week, I was assigned to visit the company’s headquarter in Beijing from 3/1 to 3/4. This is my second time to stay in Beijing. The last time I was here for taking the interview, and this time, I’m working on the business trip. How about the next time? I’m not quite sure at this moment.

As the notorious image you may know already, Beijing’s air pollution is totally beyond your imagination. Wearing a mask is a must, even most of the locals didn’t do that and the effect might not be significant. Somehow the mask is more like a placebo which makes you feel better but not really protects your healthiness. Every trade has a trade-off. I guess this is the price I have to pay while accepting the offer from a Chinese company.

However, there are still some positive things which are worthy to mention in Beijing. (Even I have to try hard to name few of them…) The first one, of course, is their seamless, convenient, and edge-cutting mobile service like We Chat and Alipay, which connected everything from online to offline in daily life. That’s to say, you can definitely survive with your mobile phone.

Second, most of the Chinese companies hold the spirit of entrepreneurship and apply it to every challenge and opportunity. (If I put it in a positive way…) Under the intensive competition and the serious stress of over-population, they have to work harder to make themselves stand out from their competitors. Thus, every possible solution is considered, even at the price of breaking rules. Somehow they prioritized making things done over making the right thing. Rulebreakers could be deemed as heroes under this context.

The last one is that they’re always making something significant from scratch. Due to the domestic market size, they can develop some unique business models that may only be found and survive in China. The desire to innovate is non-stoping and aggressive. There are several pros and cons when it comes to working in a Chinese company. As an employee and a Taiwanese, wish I could meet their demands and gain my capability simultaneously.

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