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When I joined OneSignal, I was a design team of one so part of my job was establishing the toolset and workflow.

I had been tinkering with Figma on and off for about a year but had resisted going all in. On my last team we were comfortable with our design stack of Sketch, InVision, Abstract, so the thought of switching to another tool, moving things across, and having the team move across, wasn’t appealing.

With a clean slate at a new company, it seemed like the perfect time to start using Figma in earnest. …


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At OneSignal we recently launched our new website and turned to Craft CMS for our content management solution.

Until recently our .com and web application shared the same Rails codebase. This creates several issues. Content managers can’t make changes easily. Any time we want to make a change we have to do a full deploy. Even if you’re comfortable doing this, it can be a cumbersome task making changes, and for me, there is always a fear of breaking the app when deploying.

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After researching our options looking at the different CMSs and tools available (like Wordpress, Drupal, Contentful) we decided that Craft CMS was the way to go thanks to various good comparisons online; speed, flexibility, lightweight footprint, and localization were some of the pros that consistently came up. …


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I love reading about how other Design teams are working together and what tools they’re using. It’s reassuring to know teams you admire and respect use the same tools you do. It’s also usually a trigger for me to try some other tools that either I haven’t heard of or that I’ve been meaning to look into and haven’t gotten around to it.

Designing for the enterprise has some connotations. Due to our real world experiences we have grown accustomed to enterprise software having poor UX. I’m not going to call out anyone here but think about internal tools you use at work like payroll, HR portals, intranets, proprietary software… I’m sure you can identify a bunch of tools that you use daily with poor UX. And, if you’re like me, at some point in the past you’ve thought to yourself “what were their designers thinking here?” or “what tools are they even using to design this?”. …


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At Mesosphere the Product Design team is responsible for the UX of Mesosphere products. Typically this UX primarily relates to the GUI (graphical user interface) of our flagship product DC/OS, but also accounts for the UX of our CLI (command line interface), API, documentation and other open source products.

I’m a big fan of design teams writing about their workflow. As a designer it is super helpful to read and learn how other teams are doing it, the issues that come up and how they overcome them.

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Inspired by teams at Buzzfeed, Airbnb and Shopify among others, we recently documented our product design workflow. We’re not the first to blog about our workflow but I think it is a useful exercise as it forces us to write it down, share it and critique it. …


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I came across this tweet from Bob Baxley recently. It was a poll to see what UI/UX Designers value most.

Just out in front, ahead of company mission and personal impact, was the opportunity to learn.

Ongoing education and learning is very important. While we have our day-to-day jobs — where most of the time we’re likely doing things we’re already good at or are very familiar with — we want to keep developing our personal careers and skill sets. …


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This is the third post in a series of things I’ve learned about email, including sending emails and building HTML email templates.

I’ve spent the last few years designing developer tools, 2 of those years having been Design Lead at Mailgun by Rackspace, the email service for developers. Here’s a brain dump of things I’ve learned about responsive email design.

Note: This article was originally published on my personal blog. …


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User research is a core component of a successful product design process. It gives you an understanding of user behavior and the problems users have and allows you to test out your solutions or validate a hypothesis.

The goal of user testing is to identify any usability problems, collect qualitative and quantitative data, and determine the participant’s satisfaction with the product. Usability testing lets the design and development teams identify problems before they are coded. The earlier issues are identified and fixed, the less expensive the fixes will be — Usability.gov

I think we can all agree that usability testing is a highly valuable practice. However a lot of us tend to not do it. Why is that? …


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I’ve written before about the tools I use for design. These implementation tools are indispensable and part of my daily workflow.

Other tools that I find indispensable are services that I use to gather information and help inform design decisions. I’m surprised when I talk to other designers who don’t use or have access to these types of tools for research and insights. Without these tools I’d be blind and making decisions based on intuition and best practices, which can only get you so far.

Both quantitative and qualitative research help us validate decisions, discover new opportunities, measure and improve experiences. We don’t want to make decisions based purely on data. But if there is data available or an existing user base, we should be doing everything we can to collect and understand it, before designing our solutions. …


I’m a big proponent of talking to users early in the product design process, getting feedback and iterating — aren’t we all? It’s a good way to ensure what you’re designing and making is on the path to being useful and usable.

However many of us, including myself, tend to shy away from actually doing this on a regular basis. One of the biggest pain points is time.

  • It takes time to recruit the right persona.
  • It takes time to schedule and find a time that suits both parties.
  • It takes time to set up and conduct the sessions.

Today, when designing features at Mailgun, we have a rapid workflow that works pretty well. It enables us to get quick feedback from our user base on new features. …


For Web Designers, Developers and Email Marketers

In 2013 I joined Mailgun, an email service acquired by Rackspace. Since joining the team I’ve learned a lot about building email, sending email and the industry that I knew little to nothing about before. Some might be obvious to you, some not so much.

Here’s a series of notes I think are helpful to know if you’re dealing with email as a designer or developer.

Note: This article was originally published on my personal blog. If it’s HTML Email Templates you’re looking for, I’ve put together a bundle of fully responsive templates for startups, developers and marketers. …

About

Lee Munroe

Designer Developer in San Francisco. Director of Design @ OneSignal.

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