Srebrenica

Genocide still haunts the streets, troubles the minds and overshadows the economy

Srebrenica’s city centre is surrounded by hills from all sides and has since the genocide sometimes been called lugubriously the valley of dead. ©Johannes De Bruycker
Srebrenica is a Bosnian town of 7000 people close to the Serbian border. It lies deep inside the Republika Srspska, the Serbian entity within Bosnia and Herzegovina, around 100 kilometres away from predominantly Muslim cities Sarajevo and Tuzla. — ©Lars Boogaard, created for this production.
Over 6000 Muslim men lay row by row across the street from the old Dutchbat base in Potocari. ©Johannes De Bruycker
Adim (left), enjoys the last sun and some beers with his friends in the hunter’s lodge. His friends are both Serb and Bosniak, the only one who doesn’t know their background is the stray dog that joined them. ©Johannes De Bruycker
The mosque crowds for the Friday noon prayer. There are already people waiting outside to take their friends’ places. “When I arrived over ten years ago, there was only one mosque. Today there are six in and around Srebrenica.” ©Johannes De Bruycker
Women’s organisation Snaga Zene provides seeds for the women that have survived and often lost a man in the Srebrenica genocide. According to the women’s organisation, working in the soil helps them recover from the trauma. ©Johannes De Bruycker
Muška finds her way through weeds surrounding her farm. The greenhouse in the background that Snaga Žene gave to her, is used for growing potatoes. ©Johannes De Bruycker
Houses, bombed to ruins and became big flower pots, stand next to empty shells; houses that were only partly rebuilt and not inhabited. They give Srebrenica a ghostly atmosphere. ©Johannes De Bruycker
The total Dutch aid budget to Srebrenica over the last 20 years amounts to 122 million Euros. ©Lars Boogaard, created for this production
The old bakery in Srebrenica’s main street closed down within three months after opening. The citizens of the city accuse the owner of corruption.
The Mayor of Srebrenica, Camil Durakovic believes the aid money could be spent a lot more efficiently if it went directly to the municipality. ©Johannes De Bruycker
Srebrenica’s Orthodox Christian priest has not seen improvements, on the contrary, he thinks the situation has gotten worse for the Serbs in city, “We have slowly become second rate citizens.” ©Johannes De Bruycker
In the early night Adim is still dancing on the ruins of the symbol of Srebrenica’s wealth, but as the moon rises he gets quieter, a moment of melancholy overwhelms him. ©Johannes De Bruycker

'92 - Freelance journalist

'92 - Freelance journalist