MINIMALISM; WHY DIGITAL NOMADS ARE HAPPIER + MORE PRODUCTIVE THAN EVERYONE ELSE

Minimalism is a mainstream definition which means to purchase and consume only what you need. But for traveler nomads, who have decided to quit corporate life and live differently, minimalism is a way of life.

WHAT IS MINIMALISM?

Minimalism isn’t just about throwing out your surplus material items — it’s about minimizing your schedule, getting clarity on your priorities and really being clear about what you want in your life.

It’s the process of decluttering your mind.

This minimalist way of living has changed the lives of many and not just digital nomads. Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus, have appeared all over US media and TED advocating the benefits of minimalist living. When asked why they chose this lifestyle they confessed;

“By incorporating minimalism into our lives, we’ve finally been able to find lasting happiness — and that’s what we’re all looking for, isn’t it? We all want to be happy. Minimalists search for happiness not through things, but through life itself; thus, it’s up to you to determine what is necessary and what is superfluous in your life — Minimalism is a tool that can assist you in finding freedom. Freedom from fear. Freedom from worry. Freedom from overwhelm. Freedom from guilt. Freedom from depression. Freedom from the trappings of the consumer culture we’ve built our lives around. Real freedom.”

WHY MINIMALISM INCREASES YOUR PRODUCTIVITY

For many, the appeal of minimalism comes from the idea that your life can be streamlined without sacrificing quality. In fact, in terms of productivity, minimalism is solely focused on quality over quantity. Olivia Derby in her blog The minimalist’s guide to productivity suggests that to truly reap the benefits of minimalism you have to be really comfortable with the idea that more does not equal, better.

The minimalist guide to productivity starts with one simple theory — the majority of items on your to-do list do not need to be there. By focusing on your most important goals, you can spend more time producing high-quality work.

FIVE POINTERS ON HOW YOU CAN BRING MINIMALISM INTO YOUR LIFE, RIGHT NOW.

1) THE REAL TO-DO LIST

It’s time to put your to-do list on a diet. We all have extensive to-do lists but in reality, they are burdened with trivial, irrelevant tasks. To minimalise your to-do list you need to identify what your goals are. Write your objectives at the top of your to-do list. Delete all of the tasks on your list that do not support your objectives. The ability to say “no” becomes easier with more practice — it is the minimalist’s greatest trait.

2) BATCHING

A lot of the tasks we do are repetitive. For example, marketers will need to send a few tweets a day which can be batched with tools like Hootsuite. Personal trainers and driving instructors will need to organise various client appointments which can be done in one hour at the start of the week with tools like Outlook or Google Calendars. Figure out which of your to-do list items can be batched. Then batch.

3) SET YOUR MIT’S

Start every day by identifying your top three MITs (Most Important Tasks). For low motivation days (we all get them) think of the three MIT’s as your “minimum viable product” and reassure the tomorrow you, that at least the three MIT’s got completed — if nothing else.

4) CUT OUT DISTRACTIONS

We are continually tempted by unplanned distractions that urge us to forget the task at hand. This is increasingly likely to be tech related for example social media — which has impacted our brains so vastly that we now have shorter attention spans than Goldfish. Ways to avoid tech distractions include powering off devices or removing them from your productivity space.

Less obvious distractions are things like multi-tasking. Many people, mistakingly, believe they are being productive by juggling several tasks at once. However, studies prove that multi-tasking is one of the most inefficient ways to work — it actually makes us more unproductive. A good way to wean yourself off multitasking is to have a “power hour”. Choose a task. Focus on it intensively for one hour. The “power hour” is minimalist by nature and works very well– read why here.

5) FLEXIBILITY

The minimalist mindset encourages you to under-book your day. This enables you to be prepared for any unexpected commitments. Flexibility and knowing when to stray from your to-do list is key for innovation.

If you like the sound of working for yourself or productivity hacks such as this check our facebook page or if you are serious about growth and want to be part of our 30-day travel + develop experiences find out more here

To find out more about how you can incorporate minimalism into your life check out http://www.theminimalists.com/minimalism/

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