‘EAT IN’ — A MICROSITE DESIGNED FOR THE ‘TIME-POOR’ WANTING TO PLAN INSPIRATIONAL MEALS AT HOME

Work and Family Commitments Mean I Don’t Eat Properly

DISCOVERY PHASE

THE PROBLEM/OPPORTUNITY

Sainsbury’s carried out market research to improve the use of their online shopping aimed directly at those who who led busy work, social and family lives, living in the competitive environment of the City.

They discovered that many of their customers and potential customers suffered common problems:

  • Time poor
  • Planned their meals poorly as a result
  • Often ate unhealthily through a lack of choice
  • Subsequently they often wasted food and
  • Threw out a lot of spoiled food

THERE WAS A DEFINITE DESIRE AMONGST THOSE SURVEYED TO:

  • Plan meals more efficiently
  • Find a way to purchase only the food they needed for each meal
  • Avoiding unnecessary food spoilage & waste
  • Easily source inspirational and healthy meals
  • To do this by online shopping, preferably with a mobile option

SAINSBURY’S THEMSELVES SHARED THESE GOALS IN THE INTEREST OF THEIR COMMITMENT: “TO BE THE CONSUMER’S FIRST CHOICE OF FOOD , DELIVERING PRODUCTS OF OUTSTANDING QUALITY AND GREAT SERVICE AT A COMPETITIVE COST THROUGH WORKING FASTER, SIMPLER AND TOGETHER”

THE BRIEF:

Sainsbury’s gave us a set of deliverables along with three personas that outlined their typical customers.

● Site map of entire site, including the product inventory listed below

● Navigation schema for global and local navigation elements

● Competitive analysis

User journeys of:

● Choosing meals for given days and purchasing the ingredients

User flows for:

● Choosing meals for given days and purchasing the ingredients

● Reordering previously selected meals

● Identifying and removing ingredients that user already has and does not need to purchase

● The checkout process

Digital wireframes for:

● Choosing meals for given days and purchasing the ingredients

● Reordering previously selected meals

● Identifying and removing ingredients that user already has and does not need to purchase

● The checkout process

● Clickable prototype demonstrating all user flows

PERSONAS:

We were given three personas within the brief that contained a short bio, the needs, goals and behaviours of each.

We found that in particular that Jackie personified the user that gave us the greatest fit for the problem both the brief and the research was suggesting.

Jackie was someone who:

  • Looked for inspirational themes for cooking
  • Hated wasting food
  • Liked to get ideas and tips for healthy eating
  • Liked ratings and comments (web & social connections)
  • Wanted pictures to help make her choice
  • Needed an easy way to save recipes
  • Loves to entertain

Her common pain points from the experience when attempting to shop online were:

  • Confusing or poor navigation
  • Having to visit several sites in order to chase down a meal menu, source ingredients and complete her purchase.
  • Inflexible delivery options (unhelpful and inflexible with normal work or social commitments)
  • Being forced to buy food in larger quantities than she needed or wastefully doubling up on ingredients she had already.
  • Websites not being mobile friendly

USER RESEARCH

WE CONDUCTED OUR OWN RESEARCH WITH USER INTERVIEWS

Real-time data was important to validate the user experience for browsing and shopping for food online. The interviewees we wanted, needed to share similar attributes and habits to the main persona we had selected.

The answers confirmed similar pain points to Jackie’s Persona where users struggled with the usability and the ability to achieve their goal.

USABILITY RESEARCH SUMMARY

This is what we found:

  • A variety of good inspirational themes on the Sainsbury site.
  • However, these were poorly organised and the navigation was somewhat confusing.
  • No provision for the variation of cultural food recipes or ingredients.
  • Could not edit the recipe purchase if you already had certain ingredients.
  • The quantity of ingredients per recipe was set and unable to be edited.
  • The website was mobile friendly and there was an app available for download.
  • A separate microsite called ‘Homemade’ did exist with a variety of good recipes.
  • You couldn’t order food from it directly and had to go to the main Sainsbury site to purchase.

FROM OUR USER RESEARCH WE DOCUMENTED THE HAPPY PATHWAY JACKIE NEEDED TO ACCOMPLISHING HER GOAL.

WITH TASK ANALYSIS WE WERE ABLE TO RELATE THE MORE COMPLETE USER JOURNEY TO THE PERSONA. THE TASK ACTIONS, THOUGHTS AND EMOTIONS FORGED AN ALIGNMENT WITH THE PERSONA NEEDS, GOALS AND PAIN-POINTS.

TASK ANALYSIS

Jackie’s Online Shopping Journey

CONTEXTUAL ENQUIRY

WE ADDED TO OUR RESEARCH BY VISITING SOME OF SAINSBURY’S STORES TO GAIN AN ONSITE FEEL FOR THEIR PRODUCT.

COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS

II WAS IMPORTANT TO SEE WHERE SAINSBURY’S STOOD IN THE MARKET PLACE COMPARED TO BOTH DIRECT AND INDIRECT COMPETITORS.

Sainsbury’s Competitive Analysis Where 5 rated excellent and 1 poor.

CARD SORT OF STORE INVENTORY

We also carried out an open and closed card sort to establish possible user preferences with categorisation of food inventory, which led to early sketches and contributed to further iterations of a Site Map.

DEFINING PHASE

SOLUTION TO JACKIE’S PROBLEM

THE POSSIBILITY THAT A GOOD AND VIABLE SOLUTION WOULD BE TO CREATE A MICROSITE THAT WAS TRUE TO THE SAINSBURY’S BRAND IN LOOK, FEEL AND TONE, EXISTING SEPARATELY FROM SAINSBURY’S.COM

THE SOLUTION CRITERIA WE FELT NECESSARY WERE:

  • Allow users to find meal ideas for daily use based on various criteria (e.g. specific, health concerns, children, cultures, preparation time), all on one site.
  • Allow users to plan lunch/dinner menus for special or one-time occasions.
  • Allow users to upload their own recipes that can be converted into an 
     ingredients list and subsequently to the delivered meals
  • Allow users to edit the recipe’s to account for food they already had so avoiding over-ordering and hence waste
  • Allow users to view cooking preparation lessons.
  • Allow users to repeat existing orders and meal plans
  • Rate plans and provide comments on site, share to friends and to social media
  • Save meal ideas for a later date

SITE MAP

THE SITE MAP WAS DERIVED WITH THE HELP OF A CONCEPT MAPPING TOOL WE SKETCHED WITH. THIS GAVE US OUR MAIN TOPICS FOR GLOBAL NAVIGATION AS WELL AS SEVERAL IMPORTANT SUBTOPICS. IT INCLUDED ALL THE KEY POINTS WE WANTED TO INCLUDE OUR FOCUS ON AND A HIGH-LEVEL SUMMARY OF WHAT THE MICROSIGHT WOULD INCLUDE. THE INVENTORY/INGREDIENTS SECTION WE GAINED WITH THE HELP OF OUR CARD SORT.

Sitemap sketch Version 2 and digital Version 3.

USER FLOWS

WE DREW SEVERAL USER FLOW SKETCHES TO DEVELOP THE FOUR MAIN REQUIREMENTS OF THE BRIEF:

● Choosing meals for given days and purchasing the ingredients

● Reordering previously selected meals

● Identifying and removing ingredients that user already has and does not need to purchase

● The checkout process

WE TESTED AND ITERATED VARIOUS VERSIONS INTO THE DIGITAL VERSIONS BELOW.

WE NEEDED TO TRANSLATED THESE INTO SCREENS (UI) AND USED DESIGN LIBRARY TO WORK THROUGH SOME OF THE BLOCKS WE WERE EXPERIENCING, DEVELOPING THEM AND THEIR SUBSEQUENT PAPER PROTOTYPES.

ROUGH PAPER PROTOTYPES WERE THEN SKETCHED

AND FOLLOWING TESTING AND FURTHER ITERATION A DIGITISED PROTOTYPE WAS PRODUCED AND SUBJECTED TO MORE TESTING FOR ITS USABILITY.

  1. CHOOSING A MEAL FOR SEVERAL DAYS AND PURCHASING THE INGREDIENTS.

Within this paper is demonstrated both the ability to change the ingredients that leads onto the checkout process.

HOME SCREEN: The user is invited by touch screen to gain some understanding of the microsite and to explore the ‘meal plan’ possibilities.

By Exploring you move to the second screen where you have three main options of ‘Meal Plans’, ‘My Recipes’ and ‘My Scrapbook’. The pertinent CTA’s are highlighted in orange.

Screen 1. and 2.

Screen 3. and 4.

In the screen below we see that we can select-out ingredients we already have, preventing over-ordering and the subsequent waste of food.

From an autosave into a personalised scrapbook, recipes can be sourced and placed in a meal plan for the week ahead.

The next four screens take you through the purchasing of the ingredients and the beginning of the checkout process.

Below is the option to create an account or to sign in.

Below is the checkout process 1–2; 3–4.

2. THE FINAL PAPER PROTOTYPE DEMONSTRATES RE-ORDERING A MEAL RECIPE THAT WAS PREVIOUSLY ORDERED AND SAVED.

The fourth screen, above, demonstrates the ability to edit-out the ingredients you have and wont need to purchase.

3. PROCEEDING THROUGH THE CHECKOUT PROCESS