Donuts, Highway 1 and Half Dome.

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Sometimes you picture a place in your mind. When you finally get there, those once imagined scenes unravel into the real thing, just how you thought. America so often feels that way. The scenery, the people, the city lights, you’ve seen it before. Years of films, TV, and all-round media osmosis instil that familiarity.

Here we were walking down Sunset Boulevard living out our opening scene, albeit a slightly grittier one than the average Hollywood flick. Not many others were on foot, just those that looked down on life and luck. It was a…


Skimming the surface of Oaxaca

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All the curtains on the bus were drawn. A few reading lights left on provided a dim, gloomy light. The bus driver was driving like a maniac on a route known for its endless hairpins. Each sharp corner jolted us in our seat. An old wooden track rollercoaster would have been more forgiving. Snoozing your way through this one would not be possible.

I get a nudge from Zoë a couple of hours in. Even in the low light, I can see something is not right. Her face was porcelain white and I could feel the heat emitting from her…


History lessons in Palenque and San Cristobal de las Casas

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We arrived in the small city of Palenque at the break of dawn. The town was only just waking up, with uniformed kids dragging their feet on route to school. The heat, even at that time, was unrelenting. The baking pavements seared like the hotplate of an Aga oven. We were relieved to get to the hotel to cool down. After a restless twelve-hour bus journey, a nap was much needed before venturing out. Authentic Mexican food was rightly high on our agenda when we woke. We had already learnt about the overwhelming array of food choices during our first…


Inching up the Yucatan

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You lose track of time on a trip like this. It hits you when filling out a visa form at a boarder. You scramble to consult the calendar to remind yourself what day it is. That was the feeling as we entered Mexico.
Living without the structural constraints of a “normal” working week is a pleasant feeling, no doubt. But at times even we had to place more effort on timekeeping. Our final taste of Central America would need to be more itinerated than our journey there.

Our desired route would see us traverse across Southern…


Island hopping in Belize

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Into Belize. To our surprise the border crossing was painless. We haggled in Guatemala for one final time, as we offloaded our remaining quetzals for crisp new Belizan dollars. A few entry fees later and we reboarded our chilly, near empty bus on Belizan soil. Being honest, the switch to an English speaking country felt like a treat. It reminded us how we’d missed simple things like being able to strike up small talk, or being able to understand the entirety of a food menu. Next time around a more concerted effort to learn Spanish is required.

The countryside in…


Eating up the miles on the way to Semuc Champey & Tikal

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The time had come to travel some serious miles. The rackety shuttle bus to our next destination, Semuc Champey, was the longest overland journey of our trip so far, spanning a total of fourteen gruelling hours. Conditions were cramped and it would be true test of our endurance.

We befriended an Aussie called Harry on the journey. He happened to be heading to the same hostel as us. Chatting to him distracted us from spending too much time clock watching or examining our gps location. Arriving in darkness of night, we felt jaded. However, Zoë was feeling something on top…


Antigua, ascending Acatenango, & the dazzling might of Fuego

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Antigua is a special place. Steeped in history, this pretty city is deservedly a UNESCO World Heritage site. It doesn’t take many minutes walking the streets to see why. The architecture, picturesque cobbled streets, and many religious ruins provide an open air museum-like experience. We’re not too knowledgeable on the Spanish colonial history, so we won’t go there in vast detail, but this location was once of utmost importance. It was the capital of Central America for the Spaniards. Today it is Guatemala’s most prominent tourist destination and we entered the colourful walls spotting many a gringo. The town’s surroundings…


Earth lodging & the shores of Lake Atitlán

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Waving goodbye to Costa Rica was tough. Time had felt like it had been put on fast-forward. Guatemala, our next destination, had for so long sat on a distant horizon, yet with a screech and bump we were touching down in Guatemala City. With two weeks ahead of us, we knew we wouldn’t have the luxury of a lot of time, nor a car for added freedom, but we joined the backpacker trail ready and open for a new experience. The arrival into the country’s capital was a stark reminder of some of the safety concerns occurring in Central America’s…


Costa Rica’s most magical corner

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Osa. For us, the word itself conjures up a sense of mysticism. Not many people call it home, making this enchanted peninsula a rare jewell for wildlife. And while stats tend to differ between sources, all of them baffle. Take this one for example: it’s estimated that this tiny plot of land, amounting to only 0.0001% of the earth’s surface area, contains a staggering 2.5% of the planet’s bio diversity.

The tropical rain forest here embraces a mind-bending thirteen different ecosystems, from freshwater and marine systems, to dense elevated primary forests, sandy beaches, mangroves, and more. …


The treats of the Nicoya Peninsula

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March 21st – April 3rd, 2019

They say beaches are good for the health, and having already jumped on a more wholesome track in Costa Rica, we were ecstatic to keep the momentum going with the help of the pacific coast and plentiful blue sky days.

The Nicoya Peninsula is situated in the north west of the country and spans across Guanacaste and Puntarenas provinces. It’s a known blue zone; a term coined by National Geographic, in a story covering five regions where local populations live longer and healthier lives than the global average.

Not a bad selling point. It…

Leo Fisher

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