How to Deal with Redundancy at Work

One of the greatest fear of an employee is redundancy, the act of firing an individual or a group of individuals when there job is already seen as unneeded in the company. It may be reviewed that the term may be a dismissal or dissolution of an individual or a team.

It happens everywhere: from the busy streets of developing city of Jakarta, Indonesia to the competitive world of Manhattan, New York.

Some companies who have redundant departments either reconstruct or reassign employees but there always be someone who finds himself jobless, especially when a company is cost-cutting. Since situations like these may happen, it is better to get yourself prepared.

How do you do it?

1. You’ll need to accept it

First and foremost, before you enter into a company, you should have expected that there may not be stability and forever in your tenure. This way, it would be easier if any unexpected changes happen.

Westhill Consulting and Employment recent studies show that the first blow would be the most painful. Well, what isn’t?

If redundancy is a shock to you, you are going to recoil from that, and dip into the classic stages of change, which will mean that you move from shock to denial. Whether your redundancy has been quick and came out of the blue, or whether it’s been a slow burn through a long period of time, you are likely to go through those emotions. You have to get through it. We always do but the sooner you can focus on what’s important to you, the sooner you will move on.

2. You will need your Energy

Crying over spilt milk is never the solution. Instead of begging to get back or filing a complaint in the process, try to understand the reason for the deed.

We need to understand what has happened in this redundancy process to fully recover and you will need all your strength and energy for this. Very importantly we need the right mind-set to switch on the next phase of our life. We need to be in the mood to roll our sleeves up. We know that there is a clear end coming with us leaving our organization and also that we have a new beginning coming up soon.

It’s a good time to clear the decks — sort out finances, sort out our workspace at home and get ready for what we need to be doing.

3. Learn from it

When you have undertaken this rational exorcising of your initial emotions, you’re in a better place to revise your assets. What is it you’ve got in terms of your skills and experience, your talents and your wisdom that you will be able to now work with as you move towards the next step of this post-redundancy period?