Top 6 Things Companies Looking to Hire Employees Need to Know

For the first time in 7 years I am back on the job market. I have talked to dozens of recruiters, plastered the area in my resume, and interviewed more times than I can count. I have offers. Yep, that’s plural. My first offer came 2 weeks after I began my search. I have been shocked by some of the hiring practices I’ve encountered and I thought to myself, “These companies don’t know what’s happening in the market outside their own building.”

So listen-up recruiters and hiring managers, there are some things you need to know.

6. Hire The Overqualified Candidate — Alright, admittedly this one is kind of personal for me, but listen; I did well in my last company and I made good financial decisions. I’m not desperate for a dollar and I understand the value I can bring to an organization. I’m looking for an outstanding company and some are just worth taking a risk on an entry position. If Google posted a job tomorrow for someone to sit in their lobby and direct visitors to the bathroom, I’d take it. Hell, I’d move to California to take it. Because it’s Google. I can’t tell you the number of really great companies that have looked at my resume, looked at me, and asked if I was crazy. Well that’s up for debate, but right now it appears that I think more of your company than you do. If you have an overqualified candidate in your office, ask if they understand the position that you are offering and if so, hire them. Quickly. Because…

5. You’re Not The Only Company Hiring Employees — Companies are hiring like crazy right now and your “perfect candidate” probably already has a job. The really good candidate searching for their next position is being heavily sought after by companies and recruiters in every industry. If your company’s hiring process is a 2 month, 3 ring circus with hoop after hoop to jump through, you will lose your star candidate to a faster offer. As my mom would say when I was in high school, “there are other fish in the sea”, so streamline your on-boarding process as much as you can and remember…

4. Potential Candidates Are Also Potential Customers. — Does your company sell a product? Of course it does. If you are bringing potential candidates through the doors of your facility, treat them as customers because they could be. The candidate that was worthy of your attention enough to get an interview, is talking about their experience with you to all of their friends and family. Make sure that the story they tell their network about you is a story you want told. You don’t know who is in their personal and professional network. So be a representative of your brand at all times while you…

3. Ask What You Really Want to Know — I’ve answered the same questions a thousand times at this point. You know what you want to ask me. Why are we talking about my 5 year plans? Tell me about your biggest challenge right now and ask me for my advice. Tell me something that you encountered recently and ask for my feedback. Let me tell you about something I’ve encountered that’s similar and let me walk you through my thought process in finding a solution. Tell me what your employees love about their day and what they find the most challenging. Then let’s relate that back to my experience. This way we both find out about each other. Which brings me to…

2. We Are in This Together — From the moment your candidate walks in for an interview, you are interviewing each other. Candidates want to be a good fit for you, just as much as you want them to be a good fit for you. Encourage questions and don’t over-analyze the question once it’s asked. Candidates should ask you, about your company culture. They should ask about benefit options, schedule flexibility, dress expectations. Those things matter and need to be planned for. Likewise, be upfront about what’s important to you. Don’t hide your expectations regarding performance, time management, or the fact that once a month you are required to work the weekend. Finding out something unexpected (from either party) after an offer is made and accepted, breeds distrust on both sides. Let’s put all cards on the table and start our new relationship open and honest. Speaking of putting cards on the table…

1. If You Have More To Offer Than Money, Say So Again, qualified candidates with demonstrated records of success, are being hounded right now as soon as their first resume is uploaded on a career site (trust me I’ve started saving them in my phone contacts so I can screen the calls). Now is not the time to shave off pennies on your offer. If you’re looking at a $60,000 candidate, offer them $65,000 if you can afford it because someone else already has and they aren’t going to share that with you because every how-to-get-a-job blog tells them not to talk about money. However, if you think you can’t afford their salary requirements, remind them what benefits you can offer. Do you have an incredible employee discount? Negotiated rates with gyms or cell phone carriers? Can you negotiate greater amounts of paid time off until they are eligible for promotion? Tell them that. You don’t know if they might be willing to accept less money because they like you, or you’re an easier commute, or that they just like the art in your break-room. Whatever you have to offer, showcase that. It matters more than you think.