Imposter Syndrome: Your Experience With It as a Designer and Tips To Manage It?

Question 8: How to overcome feeling like a fraud

Guy Ligertwood
Nov 3, 2017 · 13 min read
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20 Designers, 20 Weeks, 1 Question Per Week

This week we dig into ‘Imposter Syndrome’


“The struggle is real! I don’t think you can be a designer without imposter syndrome. It comes with the territory of inventing the future because there are no rules. Once you discover that everyone feels like a fraud from time to time, it doesn’t feel so bad” (Cheech)


“Worry less about others’ success, and work harder on showing up and developing your best self

You are a real designer” (Simon Pan)


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Simon Pan — Senior Product Designer at Medium, San Francisco, USA

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Andrew Doherty — CEO, Another.ai, Berlin, Germany

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Adham Dannaway — Senior UI/UX designer, Contract/Freelance, Sydney, Australia

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Ben Huggins — Sr Interaction Designer, YouTube, San Francisco, USA

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Chirryl-Lee Ryan (aka Cheech) — Head of Experience Design at Isobar, Hong Kong

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Charbel Zeaiter — Chief Experience Officer, Academy Xi, Melbourne & Sydney

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Audrey Liu — Director of Product Design at Thumbtack, San Francisco, USA

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Nick Babich — Development Team Manager, Ring Central, Russia

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Paola Mariselli — Product Designer, Facebook, Menlo Park, California, USA

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Alessandro Floridi — UX Manager at Deloitte, Sydney, Australia

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Leslie Chicoine — Experience Design and Product Management Consultant, Denver, USA

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Buzz Usborne — Product Designer at Help Scout, Sydney, Australia

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Kylie Timpani — Senior Designer at Humaan, Perth, Australia

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Graeme Fulton — Writer, coder, designer at Marvel Gibraltar, UK

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


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Kaiting Huang — Interaction Designer at Google, in Seattle, USA

Nationality:

Imposter syndrome: Your experience with it as a designer and tips to manage it

Where can people follow you?


I think what most people consider imposter syndrome is a feeling of learning — of growth. It’s the discomfort that comes with being responsible for a difficult challenge with no clear path to success.” (Ben Huggins)


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