Bitter Pill
Meg
476

My son’s policy was dropped last year when Aetna had a hissy fit and withdrew before the end of the year and we were left with only BCBS. The premiums for BCBS were the same as his rent. So there you go, the balancing of a place to live or health insurance. Which do you choose? We live in an area where we are blessed by multiple large health institutions. The one we go to will give you a 72% discount if you pay in cash with no insurance. His last visit for an allergic reaction cost $47.00, gladly paid on the spot. Generic meds are a breeze and a no brainer.

My strong feeling about one issue I brought up is this, if I have to sign up for a plan and have to be stuck with it for a year, why can a large corporation that pedals insurance back out before the end of said year? This is wrong. If they sign up it should be no different than it is for me, you are stuck through the rest of the year. No dropping someone without sufficient pass off to someone else. So much for any of these companies dealing fairly. What a joke, on top of the fact that BCBS loves to have things like big golf parties. Got to Schmooze with the other corporate elites. I have a list of those with whom I will not do business, Aetna, BCBS, United top the list. I will pay in cash rather than deal with them.

I wish that some of the large teaching hospitals would provide a sort of self insurance. You know you pay them directly, like my son did, only up front, for routine primary care, cut out that middle man(insurance company that rations care) and maybe the prices might fall. It would not hurt my feeling if a few of the major insurers either lost money or went out of business.

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