Unexpectedly awesome bug names

I was trying a self-assessment test, at some point it came out this Bohr bug. So, naturally, I google it:

Bohr Bug

[from quantum physics] A repeatable bug; one that manifests reliably under a possibly unknown but well-defined set of conditions.

But then, there’s more:

heisenbug

from Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle in quantum physics] A bug that disappears or alters its behavior when one attempts to probe or isolate it. (This usage is not even particularly fanciful; the use of a debugger sometimes alters a program’s operating environment significantly enough that buggy code, such as that which relies on the values of uninitialized memory, behaves quite differently.) Antonym of Bohr bug; see also mandelbug, schroedinbug. In C, nine out of ten heisenbugs result from uninitialized auto variables, fandango on core phenomena (esp. lossage related to corruption of the malloc arena) or errors that smash the stack.

Mandelbug

[from the Mandelbrot set] A bug whose underlying causes are so complex and obscure as to make its behavior appear chaotic or even non-deterministic. This term implies that the speaker thinks it is a Bohr bug, rather than a heisenbug. See also schroedinbug.

SCHRODINGBUG

[MIT: from the Schroedinger’s Cat thought-experiment in quantum physics] A design or implementation bug in a program that doesn’t manifest until someone reading source or using the program in an unusual way notices that it never should have worked, at which point the program promptly stops working for everybody until fixed. Though (like bit rot) this sounds impossible, it happens; some programs have harbored latent schroedinbugs for years. Compare heisenbug, Bohr bug, mandelbug.

After this, I just stopped the assessment for a moment. There something amazing (kind of old by now) that I didn’t knew. Well, the assessment showed me something I didn’ new and I can relate on, the Jargon File, so it accomplished what it was meant to do, tell me I need more.