A Couple of Forevers

A Couple of Forevers, sings Chrisette Michele.

Emily Dickinson said, “Forever is composed of nows.”

What are you doing now to improve your forever; to create the forever you want?

Me? Every day, I forgive anything that prevents the beautiful forever I am composing. Sometimes I need to forgive the same thing over and over. Sometimes I need to forgive myself.

Forgive is a verb, an action word, just like love. It’s not a statement of correctness. It is giving up judgement, resentment and the right to revenge. It’s not weakness. It’s the strength to keep loving. It’s empathy, generosity, compassion and kindness. It’s the ability to see beyond yourself.

Forgiveness allows the caterpillar to enter the awkward ugliness of the cocoon to emerge as a butterfly, with wings unique to its process.

Forgiveness is a perspective change allowing you view life’s hurts as lessons. The darkness as your cocoon time. It all happened for you. Forgiveness makes life more beautiful.

Collect lessons instead of hurts to create A Couple of beautiful Forevers. Forgive whatever is putting your beautiful composition at risk.

If the desire for a beautiful forever isn’t appealing enough, consider this from Dr. Susan Krauss Whitborne, forgiveness correlates with human mortality rates. Holding a grudge is stressful. Waiting on an apology is too. Therefore, do not wait for an apology before you decided to forgive. Forgive and tap into the life-extending benefits of unconditional forgiveness. Let that stress go!

Allow forgiveness to compose a beautifully clamorous melody that acknowledges pain and highlights healing, instead of the muffled tragic one note composition grudges create.

The beauty of forever lives in the ability to forgive. Today, start composing that beautiful forever by forgiving.

L

Sources

Psychology Today. Live Longer by Practicing Forgiveness. Susan Krauss Whitborne, Ph.D. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/fulfillment-any-age/201301/live-longer-practicing-forgiveness. Last accessed January 17, 2017.

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