By Gabby Scanga ’21

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Image: Vanity Fair

On March 20, Hulu premiered a highly anticipated eight episode series titled The Act. The show is an American true crime anthology drama, based on the lives of Gypsy Rose Blanchard (Joey King) and the murder of her mother Dee Dee Blanchard (Patricia Arquette).

The first several episodes shine light on Dee Dee’s abuse towards Gypsy; by lying about her daughter possessing several illnesses and disabilities. These illnesses and disabilities include; being highly allergic to sugar, being confined to a wheel chair, and having cancer. …


By Andrew Romulus ’21

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Image: Amazon

1: The Fifth Element

This classic 1997 sci-fi action film will keep you both laughing and on the edge of your seat. Directed by famed French director Luc Besson, the plot follows Korben Dallas (Bruce Willis), a cab driver and former military officer, who ends up in an adventure to save the Earth. With the help of a strange woman named Leeloo (Milla Jovovich), he must find four magical stones that will help in the battle to defeat an evil force heading towards Earth.

2: Spy Kids

From the mind of director, Robert Rodriguez comes a comedic spy adventure film that will have the entire family watching. The plot follows siblings Juni and Carmen Cortez (Daryl Sabara; Alexa PenaVega) as they find out that their completely unassuming parents (Antonio Banderas; Carla Gugino) are actually secret spies. In order to save them from a diabolical villain (Alec Cumming), they must team up, get the finest spy gear available, and spring into action. …


By Nola Kane ’19

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Image: Amazon

Popular author Dave Eggers has decided to take a break from his longer novels with his latest release of a novella titled The Parade, a modern parable that takes place in an unnamed country following an extended period of peace after a slew of wars.

The story focuses on two men assigned to pave a government road: the work-focused, type A Four and the rebellious, less experienced Nine. Their job advises them not to use their actual names, and numerical nicknames are especially encouraged, creating a detached feeling between us and them. …


By Lauren Lau ’19

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Image: Page Six

No matter where you go, the phrase “thank u, next” is bound to follow you there. Established by pop superstar Ariana Grande, there is no denying her talent or popularity. The singer brought her critically acclaimed Sweetener World Tour to the Wells Fargo Center on March 26.

The tour debuted in Albany, New York on March 18. Grande herself dubbed the tour as the “Sweetener/ thank u, next tour,” showcasing her two latest works into one master show. …


By Devin Bulwicz ’20

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Image: IMDb

It’s not uncommon to see a Stephen King novel adapted into a film or television show, sometimes even with multiple iterations over the years. Pet Sematary has seen two film adaptions, the first being in 1989, which follows the book more closely than the recently released 2019 adaption.

Both films have their strong points. If you’re one who enjoys movies that follow the book more closely or don’t want to be as scared, the 1989 film is more fitting for you. …


By Gabby Scanga ’21

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Image: Esquire

Nick, Joe, and Kevin were frequently used names for most of us when we were in middle school. The Jonas Brothers debuted in 2005 and released several smash hits such as “S.O.S.,” “Burnin’ Up,” “Year 3000,” and several others during their peek. The group was in every teen magazine such as Bop and TigerBeat, where fans could keep up and collect the posters.

Not only was the band prevalent in music and magazines, but their television presence did not go unnoticed. …


By Andrew Romulus ’21

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This month, Netflix has some great film choices to watch. If you’re scrolling through Netflix looking for something worth your time look no further than this list. Here are the top five choices to view during your free time.

1: A Clockwork Orange

From the mind of acclaimed director, Stanley Kubrick comes this classic yet controversial 1971 dystopian crime film. Set in a near future dystopia of Great Britian, the film follows a young teen named Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell), a charismatic teen sociopath as he and his band of thugs Georgie (James Marcus), Pete (Michael Tarn), and Dim (Warren Clarke) wreak havoc across England through their own form of “ultra-violence,” ultimately leading to their demise. The film is enjoyable while also giving great social commentary on the world of psychiatry and the disheveled youth. …


By Nola Kane ’19

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Image: Haper Collins

In 2017, Angie Thomas delivered The Hate U Give, an excellent debut novel that showed the importance of fighting systemic racism and police brutality.

Now, she releases an equally supreme second novel.

On the Come Up is told through the perspective of Bri, a 16-year-old girl whose father was an underground rapper. She, too, aspires to rap, but she has a lot of baggage to deal with. She never got to know her dad, who was killed by a gang when she was a baby, and continues to live in his shadow. …


By Devin Bulwicz ’20

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Image: Variety

I’ll admit that I have no shame and tear up and cry at movies. I don’t necessarily bawl my eyes out, but the second I can tell it’s going to be a sad moment, the flood gates in my eyes open a little bit. Add in a soundtrack that fits how the characters are feeling and that mist turns into a drizzle.

As luck would have it, I forgot to bring tissues when seeing Five Feet Apart.

I would say the “sick teenager” storyline came into the spotlight with John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars novel from 2012 that became a film in 2014, followed by other books turned into films such as Me and Earl and the Dying Girl in 2015 and Everything, Everything in 2017. Five Feet Apart from director Justin Baldoni (most known for playing Rafael on Jane the Virgin) can best be described as The Fault in Our Stars meets Everything, Everything. …


By Lauren Lau ’19

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Image: Vox

Broadway may be just a train ride away, but local theaters and touring productions make it even easier to see your favorite (or your soon-to-be favorite) musical. This year, Philadelphia’s theatre scene is introducing its new repertoire of Big Apple favorites during the 2018–2019 season. This year, the theater will be presenting a generous list of Tony winners, timeless showstoppers, and offbeat comedies ready for the next generation of theatre lovers.

Anastasia (April 9, 2019 to April 14, 2019)

Academy of Music 240 S. Broad St.

Animation’s forgotten princess will be settling in the Academy of Music next month. The musical, inspired by the 1997 film of the same title, follows Anya, a street sweeper in Russia who bares an uncanny resemblance to the lost princess Anastasia who escaped her family’s execution 10 years prior. Two local con men searching for their next great scheme, meet Anya and immediately strike up a plan to extort money from Empress Maria Feodorovna, Anastasia’s grandmother. Anya who suffers from amnesia agrees to join the men as an Anastasia imposter. …

About

Lauren Lau

Editor-in-Chief of The Griffin CHC

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