The new Samyang prime lens is incredibly small and lightweight, but yet it offers very good sharpness and image quality.

I have written a more in-depth review on DIY Photography, so the goal of this article is to provide a few sample images shot with the Samyang 18mm.

I am sorry about the image quality when you enlarge the images. Medium is applying some unfortunate image compression. You can, however, view the images on Flickr.

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Lier, Norway
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Romsdalen, Norway
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Ringerike, Norway
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Lier, Norway
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Hønefoss, Norway
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Ringerike, Norway
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Tyrifjorden, Norway
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Tyrifjorden, Norway

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Do we have to always buy the newest camera gear on the market? Does the advances in sensor technology mean that older sensors are obsolete, or are these technological advances just minor upgrades? To what degree will they impact our shooting style and image quality? I wanted to find out.

Introduction

For the past three years I have been a Pentax shooter. I have truly enjoyed the image quality, dynamic range and colors the cameras produce. The K-1 and K-1 MK II are admittedly big and heavy. The built quality is fantastic, though, and so is the weather sealing. …


If you have an image you feel lacks that little extra it often helps to adjust the midtones. To manipulate the midtones in a landscape image is a very powerful way of adding mood and non-linear contrast. The various luminosity mask panels offered today can generate various midtones masks which target specific brightness values in an image.

I do not always generate midtones masks using for example Lumenzia when I want to increase the midtones contrast. Instead, I use a Curves adjustment layer in conjunction with Blend-If. Lets have a look at an example.

I felt that the image below could benefit from more contrast and mood when I was editing it in Photoshop. …


Let’s say I for some reason would like to spice up the following sunrise image from Tyrifjorden, Norway. Even though it is a 30 sec exposure I am of the impression that the sky could benefit from a more pronounced long exposure look.

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I start out with making a selection of the sky using the Quick Selection Tool in Photoshop. The marching ants show the selection we have made.

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I store the selection in the Channel’s panel. I could if I wanted to have given the selection a name like for instance ‘sky’. …


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Ringerike, Norway, February 2019. Pentax K-1 Mark II, Pentax 15–30

Is there a secret formula behind success? Is it a five step program? Or perhaps even ten steps? What does it take? I believe there are a few keys which unlock the door. But, before we move on; what is success? We will discuss that in more detail at the end of the article.

We will start out with two of my images. This first image was shot back in 2013.

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Fast forward to 2019:

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What does it take to go from an image which almost no one noticed to an image which was awarded an Editor’s Choice at National Geographic? …


That photography has a good impact on people’s mental health is an indisputable fact. This is true for both photographers and viewers. I have read not few testimonies from persons whose mental issues have been improved due to photography. A trip out with the camera can do wonders.

In addition I have found that photography also can favour our physical health. I am now not talking about the benefits from fresh air. Or that our heart and muscles, for example, enjoy a long trek.

My back, notably my lower back, hasn’t always been very cooperative. It has had its fits where the muscles have been knots of pain. Even though I had problems walking upright I headed out with the camera, and returned home pain free almost every time. …


To revisit old and newer images of a particular scene is enjoying and it invokes many great memories from happy moments behind the camera. I find images I more or less have forgotten of which some I still find attractive whereas others indicate that my preferences and taste have evolved during the years.

This time the objective is to revisit red cabin images captured when the cabin and its surroundings are touched by winter. Snow and ice always transform a scene something which opens up for new compositions and possiblities in terms of mood and atmosphere.

2014

I readily admit that I do not have many blue sky images in my portfolio, but this is one of them. There is something about the steel blue color in the ice and the light which still speak to me. …


Catherine Simard has during the past years established herself as a major influence in the landscape community with images that are striking, creative, artistic and which, I would say, insist on a response from the viewer like great art should do.

Tell us a little about yourself.

I’m a 30 year old French Canadian based in Quebec. Currently I lead adventure photography workshops around the world, and I’m a brand ambassador for Sony & The North Face.

What made you start out with landscape photography?

In 2016, after completing 2 years of farm work in Australia, I decided to go on a 3 month solo trip covering Indonesia, Hawaii and western Canada. I had never before seen such huge mountains as when arriving in Alberta. The feeling I got when I saw them for the first time is indescribable. It was in Alberta I discovered my passion for hiking and I got introduced to scrambling, which allowed me to access more remote areas. I was doing a bit of photography at the time but only shooting in full auto mode. I started to document my adventures and fell in love with photographing the mountains. …


Tyrifjorden is one of Norway’s largest lakes. Along its shores I have found a spot which I have visited frequently the past years. It has become my favorite location for sunrises especially during winter when the sun rises right in front of me. The images included cover a stretch of roughly twenty meter of rather photogenic rocks. Due to various water levels, snow, perspective and other factors almost every image has a unique quality in spite of being shot at the same place.

30 December 2016: It was the first time I headed down here. Darkness still reigned when I arrived so I had to be careful where I placed my feet. I usually forget my headlamp for sunrises. Colors had, however, already begun to adorn the sky. Probably one of the most beautiful sunrises I have ever witnessed. It blew quite a bit that morning resulting in lots of wave action. I shot several exposures of each composition trying to capture as much wave action as possible intending to blend the exposures in Photoshop. …


My main objective isn’t to provide an in-depth ‘review’ of the lens, but I hope to offer the reader a few insights in terms of how the lens performs from a landscape photographer’s perspective. A photographer who usually prefers to shoot ultra wide angle. I received the Tamron 17–28 in October and have had time to play around with the lens a little; enough to form an opinion and to shoot some example images (by adding a Dark Reader extension to your browser it will be possible to view the images on black).

First some specifications:

  • Field of view: 75° to 104°…

About

Ole Henrik Skjelstad

Landscape photographer and math teacher from Norway — Website: https://www.olehenrikskjelstad.com/

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