Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) showed me how to use acceptance, mindfulness, values, and positive action to overcome panic attacks

Signpost showing multiple directions one could go.
Signpost showing multiple directions one could go.
Image credit: artisteer.

When I hear other people talk about panic attacks, they usually tell me it feels like they are having a heart attack. I get some of that — the racing heart, the difficulty breathing — but for me the strongest feeling is nausea.

So, in early 2019, when I was spending every morning battling panic attacks on my way to work, trying not to throw up all over my fellow London commuters was a daily struggle.

It took me longer than it should have done to work out that a) these were panic attacks and b) the fact that they were happening every morning on my way to work was probably a sign that I was stressed about my job. For someone who loves to learn about psychology and self-improvement, I can be surprisingly out-of-touch with my emotional state. …

About

Lucy Jacob

Freelance writer on health and wellbeing. Fundraiser for a heritage charity. Recovered archaeologist and mum of two. https://freelancewellbeingwriter.co.uk/

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