InDesign Forms: Three-Sided Boxes

Creating forms is, I think, the most difficult and mundane task a graphic designer ever faces.

EVERYTHING HAS TO BE EXACT. There will always be changes and when the forms are created with a mix of text and rules and symbols, it can become a real mess. Creating forms in InDesign is no picnic. Excel works better, but, hey, that’s life. It may even work better in Scribus; I’ll try that next.

The biggest problem I faced in creating this form is that I needed to create “fill-in-the-blank” boxes for the contractor to write in the customer info. Usually, these boxes are four-sided boxes. In this case, I needed to created a three-sided box — a “topless” box.

You would think this is an easy thing to do. Nahhh. I could have created them with boxes and white lines, or a series of upper-case Is with an underscore, or some other cludge.

Going Topless

HERE’S HOW I DID IT. Maybe there are better ways, but this seemed to work for me after some trial-and-error. I was able to create the boxes as “text” in the Character Styles (pull-down TYPE>>CHARACTER STYLES) palette using the Apple Symbols Glyph (TYPE>>GLYPHS) for a four-sided box, and then simply copied and pasted the number of boxes I needed for each entry. It worked for me; it may work for you.

Below are screen shots of the steps I took to “go topless.” This is InDesign CC (2015) Mac. I believe these functions are common in all versions, though.

Steps to Create a Topless Set of Boxes in InDesign

BASIC CHARACTER FORMATS

BASIC CHARACTER FORMATS

ADVANCED CHARACTER FORMATS

ADVANCED CHARACTER FORMATS

STRIKETHROUGH OPTIONS

STRIKETHROUGH OPTIONS

APPLE SYMBOLS GLYPH

APPLE SYMBOLS GLYPH

THE TOPLESS BOXES

THE TOPLESS BOXES


Originally published at Jeff Macharyas.

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