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Photo by Andrik Langfield on Unsplash

It’s that time of year again: the time when summer transitions into autumn. While many are anticipating the re-emergence of pumpkin spice- and salted caramel-flavored beverages and bites to eat, the beautiful colors of the leaves, and cooler weather, others of us are struggling to adapt to the entire concept of the seasonal alterations.

For many individuals suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), it’s easy to overlook the positive changes fall [and winter] has to offer. It’s almost like our mind won’t allow us to see or feel anything but gloom.

Most people see peacefully-falling leaves; we see the death of once-green foliage. Many enjoy the placidity of the crisp, breezy air; we associate the chilling air with stillness and deep emotional pain. Some see the early-setting sun as an opportunity for more snuggle sessions with a cozy blanket indoors; meanwhile, the reduced hours of sunlight give us this feeling of emptiness and hopelessness, as if the daytime, which we desperately long for, will never come. …


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Photo by Paula May on Unsplash

Throughout our lives, we are always told to have a plan, no matter how big or how small. Plans can range anywhere from what you plan to cook for dinner that night to what career path you will choose to follow until you plan to retire.

Due to people persistently telling us to plan things out, we wrongly believe that life revolves around planning and only that. When our plans don’t go as we intended, we stress out, we panic, and we don’t know what to do.


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Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Movies, romance novels, and the media often depict relationships as perfect and flawless. Many of our favorite celebrities seem to have an easy and enjoyable time in their relationships despite everything that is on their plates. In movies, we observe the main character getting whisked off their feet after meeting the one. The next thing you know, they’re often married within a month or two. In fairy tales, the princess meets the dreamy prince, and they always live happily ever after.

Romance seems so simple and easy to come by in all of the latter cases. While many of us enjoy beautiful love stories and romantic films, we are sometimes shocked when our own love life doesn’t roll out quite the same way. …


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Photo by Ariel Besagar on Unsplash

Tonight on Jeopardy!, game show champion and professional sports gambler, James Holzhauer, was on track to winning his 33rd game tonight. Just shy of $58,484 of past-contestant Ken Jennings’ total winnings of $2.52 million, which he accumulated over 74 consecutive games in 2004, America was stunned that Holzhauer was snowballing towards Jenning’s total earnings at a rapid rate in fewer games than Jennings.

This far into the competition, we were confident Holzhauer would beat Jennings’ record by Tuesday, June 4th at the latest. …


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Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

Rejection is something we all face at some point in our lives, even if it is completely unexpected and out of our control. Regardless of our age, race, ethnicity, skin color, background, and socioeconomic class, we all have the undesirable possibility of getting rejected by universities, employers, potential dates and current significant others, friends and family members, and the like.

While rejection is a natural, necessary, and inevitable phenomenon, it’s not something we usually take well. As a result of not taking it well, it tends to leave us feeling upset, angry, self-conscious, unwanted, helpless, resentful, and dismayed.

Why Do We Hate Being Rejected?

There are two main reasons we despise rejection so…


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Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

When we have a fear, whether it be the fear of heights (acrophobia) or a fear of spiders (arachnophobia), we are often told to face it head-on. They say exposure and desensitization are the best strategies in teaching ourselves and our brains to overcome the anxiety we feel toward certain stimulus or situation.

But of course, we cannot expose ourselves to all of our fears with the goal to overcome them. Exposure to some of the fears we have may not be possible, make sense, or even be safe.


When my generalized anxiety disorder began involving debilitating panic attacks which turned into full-fledged agoraphobia where I was completely housebound, I knew I had to make changes to my life — and I did.

Growing up, I was that kid who hardly spoke. I was obedient and a great listener; I did what I was told. The same applied in high school. By my junior and senior year, people would frequently tell me how “chill” I was, but boy, if they knew.

Since about the age of twelve, I struggled with sensations of sickness, but it wasn’t your usual case of sickness where you’d feel ill for a full 24 to 72 hours; my “illness” would come and go over not just a few days but months. Then months turned into years. I’d vomit but only before I had school. I’d feel faint and suffer from a rapid heart rate but only when I was nervous. While these sensations would come and go, they were manageable and would eventually disappear on their own. Despite the latter, I made it to school each and every day. …


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Photo by Becca Tapert on Unsplash

They say women are from Mars, and men are from Jupiter. When in a relationship, it can certainly feel like men and women are from two different planets — only that they are not.

In opposite-sex relationships, or even in general relationships where one partner is more masculine than the other, there can be some discrepancies in regard to how each partner wishes to be communicated with and have love expressed to them. Of course, regardless of gender or gender identity, everyone has their own personal ways they wish to be treated in a romantic relationship, no doubt about that.

However, speaking from myself and the many women I know and have known throughout my life, I see patterns in what a female wants out of a relationship. …


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Photo by Andrik Langfield on Unsplash

When we ask someone how long they’ve been in a relationship, we sometimes respond, “Wow, you’re so lucky” as we ponder on our own success with long-term, healthy relationships. The more we think about how “lucky” they are to have found true love and be in a relationship for that long, the worse we may feel about ourselves and our own love lives.

However, it’s important that we reiterate what it means to have luck. Luck is described as having something good happen to you due to chance, not because you were patient and engaged in hard work to get to that point.


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Photo by Alexis Brown on Unsplash

The “ugly friend” is exactly who they sound like: the person in a group of friends who deems themself, is or deemed by others, as the least attractive. Calling someone the ugly friend is clearly an insult, and calling oneself the ugly friend is surely an insult to themselves.

Whether you call yourself or are considered by others to be the “ugly friend,” there’s probably some hurt building up inside of you. You probably feel like you have nobody to turn to, and you likely feel lost. …

About

Maddy Nicole Heeszel

23. Freelance writer. Blogger. Plant nursery owner. Social media marketer. Mental health advocate. theworriedwordsmith.blogspot.com

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