When you want to go fast, go alone. When you want to go far, go together.

For the last two and a half years, /dev/color has been working with some of the most talented Black software engineers in the industry. From senior engineering leaders to engineers just out of bootcamps, we now count more than 200 engineers as part of our network across New York and San Francisco. In 2019 we’ll expand to two more cities and continue on our mission to grow hundreds of Black software engineers into industry leaders all around the world.

An equally important part of…


A Look at Where /dev/color Stands Today

I am what I am because of who we all are.

This phrase underscores the central ideology of Ubuntu, a South African philosophy popularized in the United States by Desmond Tutu. A person adhering to this mantra is open and available to others, is understanding that we all belong to a greater whole. We are thus diminished when our cohorts are diminished, and uplifted when they, too, are uplifted.

At /dev/color, we adhere to this same standard. In fact, this communal empathy drives what we aim to achieve in our work: empowering our fellow Black software engineers to reach to…


Whether they’ve just graduated from coding bootcamp or completed a course like Code Academy, newly minted software engineers often need extra preparation for the rigors of a full-time engineering role. So how can we best integrate these candidates with diverse, non-traditional backgrounds into the tech community?

Many companies are finding that an apprentice program is an effective way to offer such candidates hands-on experience while gauging if they’re a long-term fit. However, in order to offer a return on the necessary investment of company resources, these programs must be set up for success.

/dev/color recently convened a roundtable discussion on…


11 engineers gathered on June 12, 2015 for the first meeting of /dev/color. A lot has happened since that meeting. We launched to the world in October. We’ve hosted a range of leaders from engineering and venture capital. We pushed ourselves to make a deeper and more scaled impact as we went through the YCombinator accelerator program in January. We’ve shared out stories, insights, and knowledge with other engineers through our blog and speaking engagements.

The last year has been one of learning for myself, the organization, and our members. We started with a small group of members who mentored…


Makinde Adeagbo has worked as a software engineer and manager at Pinterest, Dropbox, Bridge International Academies, and Facebook. He is also the founder of /dev/color.

A few weeks ago, I answered a question on Quora explaining how it feels to be a Black software engineer in Silicon Valley. I explained that most of the time, my race doesn’t play into how I’m treated at work and how my work is recognized. While that answer is mostly true, it felt incomplete. It’s also the case that my race is so deeply woven into everything I do that I don’t actively think…


Makinde Adeagbo has worked as a software engineer and manager at Pinterest, Dropbox, Bridge International Academies, and Facebook. He is also the founder of /dev/color,

Last year I shared a definitive experience from early in my career. It led me to the realization that nobody knows what they’re doing. That experience ultimately empowered me to approach challenges head on and forge an ambitious career in software engineering. The themes in the story resonated far beyond software engineering — many folks from accounting to law told me that it spoke to experiences they’d gone through as well.

The broad appeal of…


This post is part of the #askdevcolor series, where our members share their expertise and wisdom with the community. The author, Makinde Adeagbo, is the founder of /dev/color and an industry veteran software engineer.

I’ve had lots of opportunities offered to me that changed the trajectory of my career. A notable one was attending the Explore Microsoft program. This program was one of the first early identification programs offered at a large tech company. At the time, the program brought college freshmen and sophomores to Microsoft’s campus for a 6-week internship. We took some coding classes before working in small…


Makinde Adeagbo has worked as a software engineer and manager at Pinterest, Dropbox, Bridge International Academies, and Facebook. He is also the founder of /dev/color, which is hiring!

It’s not always obvious to people why an organization like /dev/color needs to exist. I’m often asked, “Why not focus on the earlier stages of the pipeline?” or “Isn’t it too late to make a difference by the time someone is in the industry?” These and other similar questions can be rolled up into, “Why does this organization need to exist?”

It is important to say upfront that we absolutely need efforts…


Makinde Adeagbo has worked as a software engineer and manager at Pinterest, Dropbox, Bridge International Academies, and Facebook. He is also the founder of /dev/color.

From the outside, it looks like my career has been smooth sailing through some of the top tech companies in Silicon Valley. A very different picture emerges when I’m describing my career to those around me. I start to tell folks about the unexpected times where I struggled and learned something new about how to advance. The story I tell the most is about a certain javascript file I once wrote. I’ll never forget color.js.


The diversity data reported by the top companies in Silicon Valley is alarming and unacceptable. There’s a serious lack of Black representation at every company, and the disparity is even greater within engineering teams and leadership roles, barely breaking one percent. To take steps to combat this issue, today we’re announcing /dev/color, a non-profit organization that aims to maximize the success of Black software engineers.

The idea for /dev/color came about when I was mentoring a Black CS student at Stanford, who went on to complete three outstanding internships at a top tech company. The relationship was so successful and…

Makinde Adeagbo

Founder of /dev/color. Former engineer @ Pinterest, Dropbox & Facebook.

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