Part 2: Leveraging Contentful Rich Text Fields

Welcome to part 2! If you missed part 1, you might want to read it so you can gain a fuller understanding of what we aimed to accomplish. Otherwise, keep reading for the much anticipated ending to our journey!

Flamingos migrating in Kenya

Contentful Rich Text Fields

The rich text field on Contentful is the most fancy field type you can get on their platform. It provides a nice UI for adding extra formatting to text. It also allows you to embed other content types either inline or as a block right in the field as long as you handle its rendering in your codebase.


From Omnia at UPenn

Outgrowing WordPress

The Flatiron School’s marketing website was formerly built with WordPress and a custom PHP backend. Over 7 years the site grew as the school went from serving 1 course offering on 1 campus in 1 city to 3 course offerings on 12 campuses in 11 cities with thousands of alumni and current students. This site had many endpoints both seen and unseen to the naked eye and many, many blog posts. All of this started to not only slow the website down but it made the WordPress back end hard to navigate for newcomers.

Identifying the Challenges

Our team made the decision to…


Part 1: A journey of data parsing and migration

The other great migration

Outgrowing WordPress

The Flatiron School’s marketing website was formerly built with WordPress and a custom PHP backend. Over seven years, the site grew as the school went from serving one course offering on one campus in one city to three course offerings on 12 campuses in 11 cities with thousands of alumni and current students. This site had many endpoints both seen and unseen to the naked eye and many, many blog posts. All of this started to slow the website down and make the WordPress back end hard to navigate for newcomers.

Identifying the Challenges

Our team made the decision to use the JAM…


Another Women’s History Month is coming to an end. As we say farewell to the month where we more actively celebrate the achievements of women than say, November, we take a moment to get to know the heroines who make up almost half of Flatiron School’s Technology Team. Learn their favorite snacks, who their role models are, and what inspires them most about Flatiron School.


Sometimes we’re going to get approached by a family member or a friend to build their website. Certainly we can do it. As web developers we can build anything! But can we do so mindfully with the user’s best interests at heart? Right now, the answer may be no because you may not know what you don’t know in terms of UX/UI design practices but by the end of this post, I can guarantee you’ll be a more wholesome developer whose every line of code will have your user’s best interests at heart.

Definitions!

It’s important that we narrow down what…


Are you tired of the fonts that come built into the browser?

Are you looking for a certain *pizzazz* to make your app .pop()?

Look no further. We’re going to import some custom fonts to make your app feel more original!

CSS Font Stack

The CSS font stack consists of 46 fonts that you can define in your .cssfile using the font-family property. That’s a lot of choices! However, these same fonts pop up all over the web making us accustomed to them already.

It’s kind of like going into your fully stocked fridge at 2 AM and still not being able to…


If you read my last post, I used Ruby enumerators to create the basic structure of an opera aria and an art song using the #map and #each methods. I feel pretty comfortable with iteration and figured it was about time that I built upon what I already knew about it. My solution literally fell from the sky in the form of my instructor.

While sitting in a lecture today, my instructor used a shorthand that I was not familiar with. Names, in this case, is an array of strings.

names.map(&:upcase)

He very briefly explained that it was a shorthand…


In opera and classical music we have this song structure called the da capo aria. Da capo means “at the head”- it’ll make sense later. Basically, in this structure, the aria is split into two sections: the A section and the B section. If the A section is fast, the B section will be slower and vice versa. What makes da capo arias so special is that you can make them completely your own. …

Malorie Casimir

Singing the operatic parts of my code.

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