How to Prevent Cavities

Cavities are something that seem to be prevalent, especially in adults. While they can happen at any age, Kennewick dentists tend to see them then. However, you can prevent them, and there are some things that increase the risk. This article will go over what you can do in order to help avoid this, and what will increase the risk.

You might wonder how they’re formed. Well, it starts with what you eat. Food and bacteria do naturally cause tooth decay, which is cavities. Plaque, which is a white and sticky substance made of various bacteria, food, and water, will accumulate on the teeth and the gums. The bacteria that is on the plaque will feed on the sugars of what you eat. As the bacteria does feed, it creates an acid waste product that is damaging to your teeth. Basically, the bacteria feeds on this, and every time you eat, the acids will reach a dangerous level for about 20 minutes after that. Over time, the acids will get to the enamel of the tooth and soon, it causes damage of the tooth structure and the cavities as well.

In a sense, you are what you eat. If you eat sugar, you’re going to have bad teeth. If you have foods high in carbs period, it’ll definitely cause this as well, so it’s not just the candies, but it’s also various breads, cereals, and rice. This is broken down into fermentable carbs that sit in the mouth, and that is food for the bacteria. Th waste product of this is acidic, which will break down the enamel, which causes the cavities. If untreated, it goes to the pulp and nerve, which leads to a lot of other problems.

Another way to increase your risk for this is to no brush your teeth and to not floss on the regular when you’re not seeing a dentist for a checkup or cleaning. By brushing your teeth, you’ll be able to remove the plaque from the surface of the teeth. If you don’t want cavities, brush after every meal, with brushing before bed being the most important. If you floss every day for once a day, it gets the deposits between the teeth, which is where a horde of plaque will build up. Combine this with cleaning to really help keep the decay from getting worse, that’s for sure.

Fluoride deficiency is another cause of cavities and tooth decay. Fluoride does help make the teeth stronger, and it’ll make them more resistant to plaque. You should make sure that you have at least three fluoride exposures per day to lower the risk. It’s used in water that is public, and in most toothpastes. If you’re not getting enough, you can get additional treatments as well.

Finally, there is not enough saliva. You might think saliva is gross, but it actually will wash away the foods, sugars, and the plaque there. It also helps with the high acid levels, neutralizing them after you eat. Dry mouth is a normal part of aging, but there are other ways it’s caused. It’s a side effect of over 500 medications, including ones for allergies, asthma, high blood pressure, pain, high cholesterol, and even depression. It’s important that you keep in mind that this might be the case, and to make sure that you do consult your dentist and tell them of any medications you’re taking. There are a few that can combat the effects of dry mouth, and if you drink a ton of water, it’ll be a good place to start.

It’s never fun to get cavities, but for many, it can be hard to avoid them. However, this article, along with consulting your Kennewick dentist on this, will help you to figure out just what you need to do to help prevent further tooth decay, and in turn, through the use of this, you’ll be able to improve your overall health and wellness as well. You’ll be able to combat the effects of this, causing less cavities, and in turn, requiring less fillings, less work, and it’ll save you a lot of time and money later on if done so.