How to end up hating photography

Working as a professional photographer

Marc Esquirol
Apr 8, 2018 · 6 min read
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Valèria Cuní

As soon as I reached the legal working age, as a result of a web page I had created, I found a job as a photographer in a little company which was responsible for organizing, mainly, graduation parties for university students. After two years of experience, I wanted to reveal the positive and negative points that came to my mind; I hope it’s useful for those who love photography and are thinking to accept a similar job.

Positive aspects:

  1. You’ll learn about people, and therefore, the world.
    Every single week I was exposed to around 150–200 people, which can be a good opportunity to do some networking, but, often, they would come to think that, as a photographer, the only thing I would contribute to an entrepreneurial project were pictures. (Never underestimate anyone for the position they are in.)
    On the other hand, day by day, I was getting to know more about the recurring secondary characters that composed my photographs: bouncers, waiters, cooks… One night, I met two Pakistani cooks, brothers, who had come to Barcelona to work, whose counter-current struggle was inspiring. This job has introduced me to individual representatives of social groups that I would probably never have known, at least not to the extent that I did. This has given me a more global view of society and has taught me to be thankful for being born where, luckily, I’ve been born.

I really learned the importance of every single g’night, thanks and please.

This (meeting new people) has given me a more global view of society and has taught me to thank being born where I’ve been born.

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Valèria Cuní

And yes, these are all the positive points I could think of and, despite the fact I was in love with photography, in this case, taking pictures is not within the positive points of this job. Negative aspects:

  1. You’ll hate photography
    Those who know me from my teenage years, know that photography was my real great love. I always carried my camera as an extension of my body which continuously sought beauty; but, after taking and editing around 150 pictures a week, I trivialized the click of the camera which lost all the purpose it had before and, with it, my interest. Now, I find myself in a period of abstinence; after leaving this job, I have distanced myself expressly from the camera: I have forbidden myself to use it for a while. My intention is to miss it, and, in a near future, to take it up again but with much more strength driven by necessity. If you really like photography as an art, try not to prostitute your verses and, with this, I don’t mean, in any case, to prohibit yourself from charging money for what you do, but to really choose what you do; that all the photographs you make have a purpose because, if not, grabbing the camera will also end up losing it.
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Valèria Cuní

that all the photographs you make have a purpose because, if not, grabbing the camera will also end up losing it.

Photographers should go a step back and return to analogy, offer an artisan photography.

If it’s by necessity, I would take this job again but not by vocation, leisure or pleasure. Of course, despite the negative points, I am grateful for what I’ve learned from this experience, for the people I have known and for who I’ve become, but I might have recommended myself to continue creating images as works of art and leaving the money making for later.


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Thanks for reading,
MarcEsquirol 6647
marcesquirol.me

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Illustrations: Valèria Cuní
Linguistic revision: Guillem Turon (Huckitom)

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