We’re living in a glass-half-empty society (and it’s almost run dry). How all of us play a part in the demise of positivity.

You control our society’s perception. We each contribute to the narrative.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last 3–5 years, you know this for sure: Social media has become the new media, on every level. It now has more of our attention than television — even if the advertising dollars don’t say so. All of us are contributors to each of our perceptions, and we’re all complicit too.

We as a general public complain non-stop about major and local news outlets reporting “only the negative” — but why then — do we turn around and flood our timelines with negativity? Hypocrisy.

If Facebook and Twitter are to social media, what CNN and FOX News is to television — consequently, we are all (social) reporters, some of us even news anchors. We then have to acknowledge a standard of (social) responsibility, a low standard thus far, and audit ourselves and each other, when necessary. Our first amendment right cannot always be used to excuse the urge to troll or propel hatred, in the midst of genuine disagreement. We as (social) reporters are responsible to some extent and complicit in the same fear-mongering we accuse broadcast news of doing. We cannot see it differently. Sure, we operate with slightly different tactics, and methods, and protocol, but within the same formula. If we agree on the impact of social media, we must also own the responsibility that comes with it. Your posts contribute to a narrative.

Be responsible. Value positivity. Count your blessings — it’s good enough to share. Stop excessively caring about your ratings (i.e. your followers); leave that to the television business.

Audit yourself. Audit your social media timeline.

Maintain a reasonable balance between villains and heroes, injustices and victories. Be the change. Tilt your mentality towards good, not evil. You control our society’s perception. We each contribute to the narrative.

Marc