Discover the Six Best Fishing Spots in Boca Raton

South Florida is well known for fishing, boating, and other various water sports throughout the entire region. Hot fishing spots vary according to the species you’re targeting and the time of year. It also depends on whether you’re on a boat, offshore, flats fishing, or if you’re hanging out on a bank or pier. Now, most anglers won’t give away their secret spots — no matter if it’s on land or water — but I’m happy to share this information with my readers. So without further ado, here are six of the fresh and saltwater fishing spots in Boca Raton.

Red Reef Park

Red Reef Park is a 67-acre oceanfront park that is ideal for bird watching, swimming, snorkeling, picnicking, and of course, fishing. The park is located at 1400 N. State Road A1A, Boca Raton, FL. Operating hours are from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m., which is great if you want to stay a later than sundown. If you have a kayak, then you can ease out into the water on the Intracoastal side and paddle toward the mangroves and other structures. Fish tend to gather in those areas. Barracuda, bluefish, mangrove snapper, blue runners, and bonito have been known to dominate this area. You can also fish on the ocean side of the park along the beach. Take care to stay out of designated swimming areas since this is prohibited. Check with the park for any necessary fees or permits.

Yamato “Japanese” Rock

You might not hear a local call “Yamato Rock” by that name, because prior to 2004 it was named “Japanese Rock.” However, you won’t find that on a map giving you directions, so for the sake of being able to find this spot, I’m going with its current name. It’s actually quite easy to find, even without a map. Head up to Spanish River Boulevard and take it all the way to the beach. Hourly parking can be found on Spanish River Blvd. you can always find plenty of parking space in Spanish River Park. Prices are $16 on weekdays and $18 on weekends and holidays. If you’re planning on a full day of fishing, then the parking price is a deal.

Once you find parking, cross onto the beach, and head north until you see the rocks. You will probably find at least a few other people fishing at this location and you can catch just about anything here: ladyfish, pompano, snapper, snook, jacks, tarpon, etc. It really depends on the time of year. Along with fishing, you’ll catch people surfing, kayaking, swimming and snorkeling in this area. Yamato Rock is located at 3001 N. State Road A1A, Boca Raton, FL. It opens at 8 a.m. and closes by sunset every single day of the week.

James A. Rutherford Park

This 45-acre park in Boca Raton is open daily from 8 a.m. until sunset. It offers many amenities such as picnic tables, grills, a playground, and boat access. You can use a row boat, canoe or kayak for fishing in the mangroves and throughout Lake Wyman. You can also paddle out and fish along a areas of the Intracoastal. The waters are full of jacks, blue runners, etc. The entrance is at 600 NE 24 th Street, Boca Raton, FL. Admission and parking are free of charge.

Glades Rd and the Turnpike

This is just an example of one freshwater location where it’s close to impossible not to find a fish at the end of your line. If you fish any of the canals or spillways that lead from the Everglades to the Intracoastal, then you’ll find tarpon, snook, peacock bass, and many others. The water varies between freshwater and brackish, which is why there is always an abundance of fish. If you park along Boca Rio Road, you can fish in the canal that runs along it. People have reported catching peacock bass and a variety of other fish in this waterway. For those wishing to scratch that fishing itch — while laughing at all of the unfortunates who are braving rush hour to get to a 9–5 job — this angler’s perch is the place to be.

South Inlet Park

This quiet, peaceful park at 1100 S. Ocean Blvd, Boca Raton, FL, is situated just south of the Boca Inlet. It’s open from sunrise to sunset. Parking costs $3 per hour during the week and $4 per hour on the weekends and holidays. Many enthusiasts cast their lines from around the area of the jetties. If you’re new to the park, please be aware that the surf, while stunning to observe, crashes into the rocks with sufficient force to knock you off your feet. So remember to be cautious and use common sense when fishing in this area.

Also, if you’re not having much luck fishing off of the jetty, then the bridge over Boca Inlet is a short distance away, as is Lake Boca Raton. If you happen to have a boat, then you can always navigate into Lake Boca Raton and try your hand there. There are a few waterways feeding into the lake, eventually leading out into the Atlantic Ocean. Fish are constantly moving in and out of these waterways along with the fluctuating tides.

If you’re fishing with kids in a location like this one or off of one of the other parks, then if they get bored, they can take a break to play on the beach or at a playground. Kids are not as patient as most adults and often need something to break up the monotony (what adults deem “relaxing” is often seen as “boring” or “dull” by children).

Intracoastal Waters of Boca Raton

You can always find a variety of fish, such as crevalle jack (which are incredibly fun to catch might I add), if you’re coasting the Intracoastal waters in the Boca region. Mangrove snapper, tarpon, and barracuda have been known to hang out in these waters as well. If you’re fishing from a boat, try to find structures like docks, trees, and sea walls. If you haven’t gotten any hits after about five to ten minutes, then move to another spot. Believe it or not, offshore fishing in Boca Raton is plentiful if you know where to look and how to target the species you’re after. If you see someone out there fishing, don’t be afraid to ask questions. However, fishing is a variable sport, so don’t be too discouraged if you don’t catch anything the first time around. There are professionals who go out on the water and will occasionally get skunked too.

Marc Jablon

New Harbor Realty

JablonTeam@gmail.com

561–213- 6139

JablonTeam.com