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Tichomir Rangelov is one of our React Software Engineers and recently joined our Taxfix team. Previously, Tichomir was driving a taxi and owned his own company. Read on to find out how he joined Taxfix.

Tell us a little about yourself — what is your background? What did you do before joining Taxfix?

The first time I saw a computer was when I was a teenager in my home country, Bulgaria. It was a Pravetz 8 bit — and later a Pravetz 16 bit. Pravetz computers were a line copy of IBM computers during the Cold War. …


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Floria Moghimi is a certified Diversity Consultant and helps organizations to discover and foster diversity & inclusion efforts. Floria says that she is already all life long a diversity activist but started her career in communication departments in big corporates. After some time she quit and started her own endeavour She is so inspiring !

How come you decided to become a diversity coach/ consultant?

I started my career in internal communications in big international organizations in Germany. After spending years in the corporate world, I decided to leave because it got very clear that there is a lot of diversity work to do: Not only because of the lack of women in leadership positions, but also because of the lack of women of color in leadership positions. …


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Nadja Auer is responsible for employer branding for IT talent at ALDI SOUTH and a real change agent. It was probably not easy but she managed to roll-out a huge social media campaign which is targeting tech talent. Read about her strategy, learnings, and failures. She will share her experience at this year's Social Recruiting Days in Berlin.

In traditional companies, it may not always be easy to raise awareness of the “war for talent” and how you undertake recruiting nowadays — how did you go about it?

We are a traditional family business with a long history of success and core values that the company has maintained over many years. ALDI SOUTH is aware of the changes occurring in society and the economy and is actively involved in shaping these changes. Our management team is very conscious of the competition within the labor market — especially for IT experts, for which our teams design suitable employer branding and recruiting strategies. …


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I was so so unhappy. All my energy, all my enthusiasm, all my positivity was gone. Sometimes, I woke up on Saturdays and couldn’t move in my bed; not even put the plates in the dishwasher. I didn’t know what was going on. Normally, I am like a ball jumping around — everywhere. But now I was like this. I went to the therapist because I was afraid that I have depression or maybe a ‘burn-out’? At the end of that none of that was the case; I realized I needed a career change. …


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If you drop the term “employer branding” people will reply “Carl-Christoph Fellinger”. He is the employer branding dinosaur (but an agile one), leading all global employer branding efforts at Beiersdorf the skin care company producing NIVEA, Labello, Eucerin. Christoph has an exciting observation of what corporates and startups can learn from each other when it comes to employer branding.

What is successful employer branding for you?

Employer Branding is successful if you have a coherent answer to the candidate question „Why should I work with you?“. In all communication, whether it is your Recruitment Marketing channels or your employee‘s answers to friends and acquaintances. …


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Edoardo Binda Zane is a teambuilding and leadership coach. Communication and impro theatre is his passion. He is combining techniques from both fields for his training to make people more self-aware. Whenever we engage with others there is so much more going on than we realize: there is listening, there is perspective-taking, reading and using body language, there are turns of leading and following you need to respect in each interaction. Edoardo uncovers this patters in his training and helps participants to connect and link them.

What is your professional background and how come you became a trainer/coach for successful team collaboration?

Originally I come from consulting — specifically renewable energy policy — and I’ve done it for about 7 years. …


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Last week I had the pleasure to attend Gravity+ — the biggest employer branding conference in Germany. Two days full of knowledge exchange about my favorite topic employer branding. Plus, I felt so honored to hold a 90-min workshop on how to use, analyze, and exploit data when it comes to employer branding without having any big budget in your pocket (super happy to share with you — just hit me up on LinkedIn). Anyways, what are my three takeaways?


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I still remember the situation when I attended my oral exam for my stakeholder relations class at university. One of the examiners told me: “Marian, business is war! You need to ask and answer the right questions before you fight the battle.” Sounds dramatic and I am not sure if I would totally agree to the war metaphor. Indeed, I heard classical management studies has its roots in military strategies, however, there are also many other approaches. BUT ‘ask and answer the right questions before you fight the battle’ burned literally into my head.

What are important stakeholders for companies? Customers, suppliers, shareholders, governments, society, advocacy groups, NGO’s & advocacy groups — ahh sure and there are of course also employees. In management, literature employees are often treated as resources which are just there to fulfill certain needs & duties for the company in order to reach its strategic objectives. In return, employees will get some kind of compensation. In my opinion, employees are of course much more than just a means for a certain end— especially when it comes to the brand building process of an employer brand. Moreover, it’s not only one group of employees or future employees who will have a stake in the employer brand. Below, I divided the ‘employees’ into different interest groups to better understand the complexity of only one stakeholder: the employees. …


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Dr. Chiara Valentini is Professor of Corporate Communication at JSBE (Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics)and one of my favorite professors during university time. She holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Communication and Public Relations and has worked and consulted organizations and public institutions of several countries. Chiara has written over 130 publications, won a lot of prizes for top papers and competitive research. Plus, she is a pro when it comes to the management of stakeholder relations — a key skill needed for engaging with employer branding.

What was your dream job as a child — did you ever imagine becoming a professor in one of the best educational systems in the world?

No, at all. When I was a child, I wanted to be an artist. Later on, I wanted to work in advertising. Different working experiences during my university years also shaped my view of corporate communication. When I started my Ph.D. I just wanted to know and understand more about the field. I guess the fact that I have been a very curious person has helped me in this regard. Curiosity drives exploration, which can lead to new ways of thinking and innovating. Perhaps this is what fascinates me the most of my job. And of course, professors have an important task too, to train future generations of professionals in the best way. …


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Ellen Maier is a working mum with more than 13 years of experience in HR consulting for medium-sized companies. Besides her consultancy job, she has two small children — more than a full-time job. Her passion? Fighting for rights of working mums and make employers aware of the benefits.

Why do you think it is difficult to find employment as a mother in Germany?

Different factors play a role here. Let’s assume the “classic” case: A mother has between 20 and 30 hours a week to pursue her professional activities. In the afternoon she is busy with children. From the point of view of many employers and in relation to different industries and fields of activity, this is clearly too little. Most employers want maximum flexibility in terms of time, and the “face time” that can still be found in many places still plays a decisive role. Home office options? No, not at all. And this leads, for example, in the application process to applicants without children (who are then usually well under 40 years old) being given preferential treatment. The fear on the part of companies is that the children of the working mother are constantly ill, leading to many absences and that the other colleagues are frustrated and annoyed in the context of these absences. While the tasks that have to be done cannot be completed to the satisfaction of everyone. …

Marian Jarzak

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