Interview #5: Howie Begosa

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Welcome to The Game UX Interview Series, the series where one Game UX Professional interviews another. I’m Mike, the editor of this series, and for this interview I have the pleasure of introducing you to a friend and colleague of mine, Howie Begosa, a Senior UI/UX Designer at Disney. He has worked on countless Disney titles over the last decade and is an invaluable resource within our organization. Most recently, he worked on the Star Wars Jedi Challenges AR platform, and I’m very excited for everyone to hear his story.

So, let’s meet Howie!

Welcome to The Game UX Interview Series Howie! We usually kick these off with origin stories, so how did you get your start working in Game UX?


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The Game UX Interview Series is a series of interviews where one Game UX Professional interviews another. The catch, is that the interviewee conducts the next interview! Ideally, this is a person you don’t know. By doing this, we will hopefully expand beyond our own networks and create more relationships across different studios. Externally, this provides more insight to the people and processes behind the games and will allow us to hear more unique voices within the Game UX industry.

If you’re interested in participating, add your name to this spreadsheet. …


Interview #1: Maïmouna Brownrigg

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Welcome to the beginning of The Game UX Interview Series! This is a series of interviews where one UI/UX Designer in the Games industry interviews another. The catch is that the interviewee choses someone else to interview next! The hope is that we get to know each other, share knowledge and advice, and create a more collaborative industry.

My name is Mike and I’m a Lead UI/UX Designer at Disney, and I’ll be kicking this series off. I’m very excited to introduce our first interviewee, Maïmouna Brownrigg, who is a Senior UI/UX Designer at Ubisoft Montreal.

Let’s get to know Maïmouna!


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< Previous — Layout Components

Now that you have a basic understanding of Unity UI concepts, we can now begin to apply those ideas towards a practical example. In the introductory article, I gave a preview of the prototype app we will be building, this Instagram-like photo app found here.


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< Previous: Introduction to UI Components

In this article, we’ll be introducing layout components. These are the true building blocks to creating a dimension agnostic UI. Fully understanding the layout system in Unity will allow you to create flexible UI that adjusts to any device.

There are three layout group types in Unity:

  1. Grid Layout Group — Creates a grid of objects (rows and columns) of a fixed size
  2. Vertical Layout Group — Creates a vertical column of objects of any size
  3. Horizontal Layout Group — Creates a horizontal row of objects of any size

Grid Layout Group

Let’s start with the Grid, which is used when you need a grid of objects exactly the same size. …


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< Previous: Introduction

Installing Unity

If you haven’t already done so, download and install the latest version of Unity.

When prompted to install, keep the default settings and select Continue.


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< Previous: Exploring and Customizing the Interface

This article will introduce two of the main UI GameObjects used in Unity: Images and Text.

GameObjects, which are somewhat comparable to layers in a Photoshop or Sketch, are all the objects that live inside the Hierarchy. A standard GameObject contains a Transform component, which when used with 3D objects, controls it’s dimensions within a 3D space.


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< Previous: Installing Unity and Creating a Project

Since this tutorial series is geared towards designers, I like to compare the Unity interface to design software like Photoshop or Sketch. Comparing helps make the interface more relatable and less complex.

First, hide the camera icon in the middle of the Scene by going in the Gizmos dropdown and dragging the 3D Icons slider down like this.


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Unity is one of the most popular game engines today, due to it’s breadth of cross-platform publishing to mostly all mobile operating systems and game consoles. The ability to have one project that builds to every platform is a no-brainer for many game developers, so it’s unsurprising that Unity has become the primary tool for most game studios.

However, for those not working in game development, there are many other options for prototyping, and Unity is not typically one of them. …


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For this article, we’ll be taking a bit of a different approach. It’s more of a case study plus walk-through, rather than a step-by-step tutorial. It’s also much more complex, but hopefully after reading the first few, you guys are ready! Instead of focusing on one topic and how to create a plugin for that specific situation, we are going to create a custom solution using built in features plus plugins to solve a complex problem.

Sketch in all it’s prowess, is lacking one huge feature, a color palette that syncs across multiple documents. There are already some great plugins out there (Consistency, Sketch Palettes, Craft), but none of these completely fit my needs. Exporting and importing a color palette is fine when you have a visual style locked down. But if you are in the midst of finalizing a visual style, as I am on the game I’m currently working on, your color palette is constantly evolving. …

About

Mike Mariano

Game UI/UX Designer

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