Craig Murray and Caitlin Johnstone Have Just Explained that Wikipedia is a Deep State Psyops — So Take a Look at Wikipedia’s Entry on the Douma “Gas Attack”

A website that I hadn’t heard of previously, Wikipedia.fivefilters.org, has recently revealed that an entity going by the name of “Philip Cross” has been working 24/7 to insure that Wikileaks entries dealing with political affairs reflect the perspectives and concerns of our Deep State masters.

https://wikipedia.fivefilters.org/

How remarkable that this “individual” is so committed to keeping us informed of the “True Truth” that he/she has perfected the art of going entirely without sleep.

The great whistle-blower Craig Murray has published an insightful essay amplifying this revelation, and the initimitable Caitlin Johnstone has highlighted this issue in her most recent essay:

https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/archives/2018/05/the-philip-cross-affair/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

https://medium.com/@caityjohnstone/wikipedia-is-an-establishment-psyop-c352c0d2faf

This rang a bell with me, as I had recently examined the Wikipedia entry on the “Douma chemical attack”:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douma_chemical_attack

The part that I found most intriguing was their discussion of “Media Commentary”:

CBS journalist Seth Doane also traveled to Douma on 16 April, where a neighbor reported a choking gas that smelled like chlorine. A man took him to the alleged site of the impact and showed where the remains of a missile rested.[65] Eliot Higgins, a citizen journalist and blogger investigating the Syrian civil war,[66][67] concluded based on geographical, video, and open source evidence that the chlorine gas was dropped by helicopters coming from Dumayr Airbase.[68][69] Military officials in London, Paris and Washington also insisted the attacks came from Dumayr.[70]
The Guardian reported testimony from several witnesses that medical personnel in Douma have often been coerced into denying the existence of a chemical attack, with themselves and their families allegedly being threatened by the Assad regime if they offer any public testimonies.[71] The Guardian described Russian state media as “pushing” two lines; that they have spoken to witnesses denying the occurrence of any attacks, and that they have found chlorine filled canisters in Douma “used for rebel attacks later blamed on the regime.”
Russian officials′ statements were interpreted by Nic Robertson of CNN as an indication that the chemical attack in Douma had been planned by Russia in advance as an asymmetric warfare tactic in response to reactions by the West after the poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skripal.[72]

What a shame that Wikipedia couldn’t be bothered to mention the reporting of Robert Fisk , 7 time winner of Britain’s Press Awards Foreign Reporter of the Year, who was one of the first journalists to report from Douma following its fall to the Syrian army.

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/syria-chemical-attack-gas-douma-robert-fisk-ghouta-damascus-a8307726.html

Nor could Wikipedia find the space to cite the on–the-ground video reporting of Preston Sharp, from the U.S.’s One America Network, who interviewed numerous randomly chosen citizens of Douma, as well as the medical staff of the only functional hospital in the city.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iD9C9koRmro&t=2s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9w8j-avq_0&t=615s

It must surely be a remarkable coincidence that Fisk, a liberal/progressive war correspondent of high renown, and Sharp, who works for a conservative TV network that typically supports Trump, both appeared to “push” the same “lines” as the Russian state media.

As to the intrepid Seth Doane of CBS, as well as Britain’s Guardian, I have commented on their Douma reporting in this previous Medium essay:

https://medium.com/@markfmccarty/for-your-viewing-pleasure-hilarious-press-releases-and-msm-reports-on-the-douma-gas-attack-353963d10999

Suffice it to say that I characterize this reporting as “hilarious”.

I confess that I haven’t yet caught up with the deep insights of CNN’s Nic Robertson, but who among us is perfect?