Huh?

We like to ask questions.

What was that guy thinking? The guy who made peanut butter and jelly. How did he happen to make something so brilliant? How about the guy who started milking cows? What was he thinking? Or the grape and cheese guy? The list goes on.

Asking is easy. Answering is difficult. Why is this like that? Why isn’t it more like this? When will this become that and that become this? It’s an unending cycle which involves a yearning for things to go the way they should. This is something we learn growing up and we expect to see the same civility as we grow older.

But what happens when we don’t see it? What happens when injustice is so strong that even the basic expectations you would have for a society goes awry? That even the simplest courtesies have become rare. So much so that the world doesn’t even recognize or value it. As a human being, it is easier to question the plan than to believe. It’s easier to judge based on what you see than what you know to be true. This introduces dissonance*.

And that’s the cool part. Just because two different things don’t usually go together, that doesn’t mean that they can’t go together. We usually associate questioning to doubt, and doubt to disbelief. But what if we can associate questioning with faith? That sounds far fetched at first but if you really do think about it, even basic prayers are in question format. The only problem with questions is the fact that we often don’t settle for answers that don’t satisfy us. The mere definition of faith is hoping for what you do not see. I don’t know about you, but the humanity in me often feels uneasy at this point. But that could/should still lead to more faith. We need to learn to associate this uneasiness to believing more, trusting God further.

How does this look like? We continue living in a Christlike manner when the whole world does as it does; we choose wholeness over hostility, love over lust, and giving value to friendships. We may not change the world immediately. Our kindness over our neighbors may not stop nuclear wars or earthquakes, but this is an opportunity to see where our faith and hope truly lie.

Insert Psalm 13

*two true ideas that appear to be conflicting

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