In the previous articles, we discussed how to turn an idea into a product. Let’s have a look now at what the pitfalls could be once your product has got some traction.

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If we are lucky and our product succeeds, we next have to deal with scaling problems. The company’s capacity, its supply chain, its technical solutions and support mechanisms have to deal with increasing demands from customers. If your solution involves too much technical debt or your company operations are not ready, you can quickly end up frustrating your customers and losing their interest. …


In previous articles we talked about the necessity of vision and product validation. In this article we will look at how product discovery and product delivery support the product validation process.

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Product discovery helps us to answer the following questions:

  • Will users buy the product? Does the product solve a real problem?
    (market research, competitive analysis, surveys, etc.)
  • Can users work out how to use the product?
    (prototyping, user testing, user experience, A/B testing)
  • What are the product’s limitations and obstacles?
    (time, money, technology, design, brand, supply chain, resources, knowledge)
  • Given those limitations, is it feasible to develop the product?
  • What are the risks and how we can mitigate them?


In previous articles we talked about the necessity of vision and product validation. In this article we will look at how product discovery and product delivery support the product validation process.

Image for post
Image for post

Product discovery helps us to answer the following questions:

  • Will users buy the product? Does the product solve a real problem?
    (market research, competitive analysis, surveys, etc.)
  • Can users work out how to use the product?
    (prototyping, user testing, user experience, A/B testing)
  • What are the product’s limitations and obstacles?
    (time, money, technology, design, brand, supply chain, resources, knowledge)
  • Given those limitations, is it feasible to develop the product?
  • What are the risks and how we can mitigate them?

In the previous article I talked about the importance of having a vision for product development. Today I will look at why we need to validate our ideas.

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Once we have a vision we can start brainstorming products or features which we could use as vehicles to advance it. The only goal at this stage is to generate a lot of ideas. Once we have those we then face the difficult task of deciding which ideas have real potential and which do not.

In 2009, the Avatar movie revealed the power of 3D technology in cinematography. 3D TV looked like a logical step forward and TV manufacturers jumped on that as the next big innovation in the TV industry. Yet by 2017, it was quite clear that 3D TV was dead. The fanciest feature is not always the right feature. Any innovation needs to address its users’ needs, fix their problems and bring them added value. …


Any venture must be based on a clear, sound and inspiring vision. Simon Sinek, author of bestselling books such as Start with why and Leaders eat last, calls this vision a “Just Cause”. Without knowing why we are making the product and whom it stands to benefit we set ourselves up to fail regardless of the product’s features.

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A Just Cause is a specific vision of a future state that does not yet exist; a future state so appealing that people are willing to make sacrifices in order to help advance toward that vision.

The Just Cause must be:

  • For something — affirmative and…


Do you ever wonder why some companies skyrocket while others fail? Even companies like Apple, Microsoft, Google, and Amazon started small, fuelled by their founders’ enthusiasm. Everyone knows the companies that have succeeded, but for each of these blue-chip stocks there were another 100 or 1000 promising companies with interesting products championed by clever enthusiasts that ended up bankrupt.

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Even the most successful companies regularly develop products which have no real success or traction. In 2006, Microsoft introduced the Zune MP3 player, which was designed to compete with the wildly-popular iPod. That product was discontinued in 2011, shortly after the release of its third generation. In 2014, Amazon attempted to enter the smartphone market with the Amazon Fire Phone. Despite significant investment in its development, the Fire Phone did not prove competitive and was withdrawn at a loss of $170 million — a mere drop in the bucket for Amazon. In 2013, Google released Google Glass, a fancy gadget with limited use cases and an even more limiting price tag. …

Martin Srb

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