Do Your Business Cards Suck? I Bet They Do.

How to make your business cards better than the other guys.


A perfect example of a boring business card you should never have made to represent you.

If you do anything even remotely artsy fartsy, and I’m talking about Writers. Artists. Musicians. Photographers. Filmmakers., then you have no excuse having shit business cards. Whether you’re unhappy with your current ones, or in the process of designing them for the first time, I have a few simple tips to help make yours stand out from the other guys. Being a photographer I meet a lot of artists, and of course, I swap a lot of business cards; the problem is, most of them are terrible. You know the kind, the ones your service advisor at the car dealership gives you, or the loan officer at the bank. Thin. Terrible typography. 1996 Microsoft Word clip art. Just plain junk. Well I’m here to give you a few tips on how to make a business card that will separate you from the other guy.

  1. Money. Money. Money. Money. Money. Good business cards come at a price, and if you want something that’s too good to be chucked in the fish bowl at Cousins Subs for a free weekly business sub, then you’re gonna have to spend some dough.
  2. Typography. Read this Medium story “Fonts Have Feelings Too” by Mikael Cho because it will tell you exactly how fonts and typography are one of the most important things when working with text. The font, the spacing. You name it.
  3. Differentiate. You need a card that separates itself from everyone else's. I use Moo.com. They don’t make shit. They have everything from square cards to rectangular cards to the cards I use which are thick and the back and front are separated by a color of your choice.
  4. Own your craft. If you’re a photographer, use your best photos as your business card. If you’re a musician, or a writer or a filmmaker, Moo.com has cards with NFC chips built into them “So when it’s touched to a smartphone, the chip asks the phone to do something. Something you’ve told it to. Perhaps download your portfolio, play music or video, load web pages, maps or apps, save your contact details — the possibilities are endless. Think of it like an enormous, dynamic and exciting third side.”
  5. Care. Don’t get 1000 of the cheap stock business cards because you’re a cheap ass. Your business card is your first impression and people will notice that. They will see the time and effort you put into your cards and it will make you stand out to them and make them believe you might just be a little bit better than “Music Man DJ Services.’’
I have 9 different business cards featuring photo’s I’ve Shot.

Nothing says ‘I don’t care’ like a crappy business card from some DJ or tacky wedding photographer, and it’s sad because I know those people spend a lot of time and money on what they do, and they are genuinely proud of what they are doing. The thing is, there are a lot of great companies out there that offer fantastic business card services if you just spend a little time on Google; that’s how I found Moo.com. It’s all worth the extra time and price because at the end of the day, if you’re an artist, you are artsy fartsy, and your business cards should be a reflection of that creativity, and besides, what’s an extra $100 if it gets you a few more $1,000.

Moo.com


If you liked this you can follow my collection on Medium www.medium.com/@martinmoorejr. I enjoy writing about Travel, Technology and Photography, but not if nobody gives a shit. www.martinmoorephotography.com www.twitter.com/martinmoorejr #livemoredomore