How to Reduce Drudgery in Your Business

Let’s play a game.

It’s called: get Martin to help you for free.

Here’s how it works:

I explain something, and then I ask you two questions.

You reply with your answers, and then I try to give you a recommendation on how to reduce the drudgery in your business.

Because whatever your type of venture, there will be things you *think* you need to do in order to reach your goals, and some of those ain’t any fun.

And very often, changing those things, or replacing them, will be more effective as well as more enjoyable.

So let’s play.

See, coaching is about questions.

The process of guiding someone to create deep and lasting change in your life, is best done by asking specific questions.

Because I’m not here to bring the answers, or to quote Tony Robbins:

I’m not your guru.

You are, you have the answers.

My job is to ask those questions that bring out those answers.

So, one of the most powerful coaching questions is:

When you were a child, what activity made you lose all sense of time?

Sit with this for a moment.

What made you completely forget yourself and the world around you?

So absorbing, that you had no sense of time?

What activity caused that?

The reason I’m asking is because it can be very easy to use that activity, or an grown-up variation of it, and implement it in your business practice.

And I’m sure you’ll see that that will make something that used to be dull and dreary, into something fun.

For me, it’s connecting with people, talking, listening to others and trying to see ‘what makes them tick’.

So that’s what I do in my marketing: connect, listen, explore. ‘sFun.

(Just remembered: when I had just started meditating, I told the gent who would later become my abbot: “I intend to find out exactly what makes you tick”.

He raised an eyebrow and said: “Do I tick?”)

Anyway.

What activity, as a child made you lose all sense of time?

Second question: which activity in your business would you rather avoid?

Let me know, and I’ll try to give you a practical suggestion.

Game is on.

Hit reply.

Cheers,

Martin


Originally published at MartinStellar.com.

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