Bucket List? That Was Yesterday. A Better Storage System For Dreams!

Phoenix, AZ — It’s overcast in this neck of the desert today. What better time than now to create this post. Clouds are good — especially over this sandy, rocky, cactiful ecocosym.

Consider the bucket. There is a long list of ways it is useful:

  1. Mops + Water + Vinegar + Elbow Grease = Clean Floors

2. Friend of the Automobile’s Interior = catchall. And I mean “all.”

3. Holder of toilet plunger. What other object loves the plunger?

4. Toy. Ah, the dirt and little cars and green army men (do kids still play with those?) and worms and crayfish.

5. Object Of The Open Hand. Nothing is gross to a bucket. It is a nondiscriminatory object. It will even hold hot lava and destroy itself in the so doing because it sacrifices itself for the goal of The Hold.

6. Other things that only you the reader can add here….

In its very bucketness, a bucket holds nouns. Solid persons, places or things. (Yes, a place. That bit of dirt with the worms in it you put in the wooden bucket is now a microcosm, a place.)

Evaporate the water in the bucket and you get the Cloud. That is the appropriate place in which to store your dreams and List Of Things That You Want To Have Happen That Have Not Happened Yet At Least In The Present Reality.

Do you want to travel to India some day? Put that thought into Cloud Storage!

Do you want to move from the big crowded city to the quiet treeful country? Cloud it.

Do you want to walk around all day under a great big imaginary puffy intriguing cloud in the land where no commas are necessary? Cloud. Or, Medium, as the case may be.

Yes, kick the bucket, my friends. Create a Cloud List. Store all your possibility in The Cloud so you can reach up and pull them toward you. Your dreams are like raindrops in the desert: very appreciated, well used and special.

This is in contrast to removing things from a bucket — worms, dirt, green army men, little cars, trash, mop water. And more.

Bucket List? So 1900s.

Cloud List? To your future and beyond!

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