Why I’m Assaulting the Motion Picture Industry on Facebook

For the last few months, I’ve been asking questions and making statements that would get me blacklisted from Hollywood and thrown out of the ASC (American Society of Cinematographers) Clubhouse.

I get messages from my friends: “Why are you writing these controversial posts on Facebook? People think you are crazy!”

I’ve challenged industry leaders that I’ve worked with for the past 10 years. I respect their opinions and I need them to participate in what I’m doing. Many of them probably wanted to “de-follow” or “de-friend” me. But the truth is that creative minds like a challenge.

My Personal Facebook Page is public for anyone to read

Why I’m Deconstructing Cinematography

In 2016 and for the next 10 years I am going to be teaching cinematography to your children and the next generation. I’ll be doing this online through my platform Cinematography Database. Every controversial prompt that I’ve written on Facebook is what I imagine the next generation will say to me.

Every controversial prompt that I’ve written on Facebook is what I imagine the next generation will say to me.

I look at the fire in my son’s eyes and I know that he has already changed me and that he will disrupt the world. I rememer how I felt about my parent’s point of view of the world. I know he will be no different, so I’m disrupting myself.

I am building a safe place for the next generation to learn, try, fail, share, and succeed at cinematography. I want to turn the industry’s “gear lust” into “knowledge lust.” However, for me to able to teach cinematography, I must deconstruct it and rebuild it as a child would see it.

TLDR version starts now (Skip it, Go ahead)

I set out to broadcast what I knew about cinematography. But when I began writing I began to question the words that I saw on the screen. Was this the truth? Is this really what I’m going to pass to the next generation?

I want to see cinematography and the industry with fresh eyes. I want to separate myself from the dogma and the standards that I’ve learned over my career. Some things from the old school are universal, but not all of them.

I don’t watch movies, TV, or play videos games. I only read (so pretentious, I know).

Tech Disruption

I read about other industries and how they have weathered technological disruption. I attempt to understand how technology will change the motion picture industry.

Business and Marketing

I read about business and marketing. Reaching the current generation requires trust and it requires listening. Reaching the next generation will require different tactics but I will find them or develop them myself. Even if it requires Vertical Video and Virtual Reality.

Economics and Leadership

I read about economics and leadership. Money is the energy of business world and it dictates everything that happens in the motion picture business. Learning cinematography without understanding the business is unacceptable.

History and Social Change

I read about history and how people have fought institutionalized racism, sexism, and elitism to make the world more understanding and accepting. There are aspects of the motion picture industry that need to be changed.

Education and Online Learning

I read about education and about a generation crippled by for-profit 4 year universities. I read about the future of online education and the growing world wide population of online life learners. Cinematographers have an innate thirst or knowledge. When they stop seeking knowledge they become dead weight to the industry.

Cinematography Design

I am combining traditional cinematography, virtual cinematography, industrial design, architecture, graphic design, and many other industries and building a new unified category called Cinematography Design.

I will spend the next 10 years of my life developing and teaching this to the next generation.

After 10 years of running this company I believe that I’ll be ready to pitch my next business to investors. But I need Cinematography Design to be established in the world first.

Cheers,

Matt