Adjective Clauses And Dashed Lines

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This is the tenth lesson in my series on sentence diagramming. If you’re just now discovering this series, you should begin with the introduction. It will make much more sense if you do:

This lesson will be on diagramming adjective clauses. But first, here are the correct diagrams to the “try it at home” sentences from the previous lesson:


Infinitives: The Easy Verbals

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This is the ninth lesson in my series on sentence diagramming. If this is your first time finding this series, it will all make more sense if you begin with the introductory lesson here:

This lesson is on diagramming infinitives. But first, here are the correct diagrams to the “try it at home” sentences from the previous lesson:


Walk Like An Egyptian With Gerunds

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This is the eighth lesson in my series on sentence diagramming. If you’re just discovering this lesson, you should begin with the introductory lesson, found here: (It will make more sense if you do.)

This lesson will focus on diagramming gerunds. But first, here are the answers to the “try it at home” sentences from the previous lesson:


How To Diagram Participles. (And A Reminder Of What Participles Are.)

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This is the seventh lesson in my series on sentence diagramming. If you’re just discovering this lesson, you should begin with the introduction: (It will all make more sense if you do.)

This lesson is on diagramming participles. But first, here are the answers to the “try it at home” sentences from the previous lesson:


Compound Sentence Elements

Photo: Kelly Sikkema via UnSplash.

This is the sixth lesson in my series on sentence diagramming. If you’re just now discovering this series, you should read the introduction first. Here it is:

This lesson will be on diagramming compound sentence elements. But first, here are the answers to the last lesson’s “try it at home” sentences:


Compound Sentences: Two Diagrams In One

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This is the fifth lesson in my series on sentence diagramming. If you’re just now finding this lesson, you should begin with the introduction:

This lesson is on diagramming compound sentences. But before that, here are the answers to the “try it at home” sentences from the previous lesson:


Self? -Selves? Intensive? Reflective? What?

Photo: Negative Space via Pexels.

This is the fourth lesson in my series on diagramming sentences. If you’re just now finding this series, you should go back to the introduction before you move on. You can find the introduction here:

This lesson is on intensive and reflexive pronouns. Those are the same words (themselves, ourselves, etc…). What makes them “intensive” or “reflexive” is just how they’re used in the sentence.

But first, here are the answers to the “try it at home” sentences from yesterday:


Questions, Contractions, and Commands…

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This is the third lesson in my 13-part series on sentence diagramming. If you’re just finding this now, you should go back to the introductory lesson here:

This lesson is on diagramming questions, contractions, and understood subjects.

But first, here are the diagrams for yesterday’s “try it at home” sentences:


What’s An Appositive, Anyway?

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This is the second lesson in my 13-part series on sentence diagramming. If you’re just finding this now, you should go back to the introductory lesson here:

This lesson is on diagramming appositives and interjections.

But first, here are the answers for the questions at the end of lesson one. Notice that compound proper nouns like “New York” and “Lincoln Park” stay together in the diagram:


It’s All About the Verbs…

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This is the first of thirteen lessons on sentence diagramming, which I introduced here:

In this lesson, you will learn the basics of sentence diagramming, including how to diagram:

  • Verbs
  • Subjects
  • Direct and Indirect Objects
  • Subject and Object Complements
  • Adjectives and Adverbs
  • Prepositional Phrases

The first step to diagramming a sentence is writing the sentence and labelling each word’s syntax. “Syntax” just means how each word is used in the sentence. That will make more sense as we go.

Here are the five example sentences I’m going to use for this lesson:

Matthew Bates

Yes, I’m that Matthew Bates from Quora.

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