Oslo

Have heart, my dear readers, this blog will be a short read. Our time in Oslo was characterized by expensive food and public transport, iffy weather, and lots of walking (even more than usual). Though it rained off and on, we did manage to see a few cool things. First, at the National Art Gallery we took in a nice, brief history of Norwegian artwork, including Edward Munch’s famous piece “The Scream”. In addition to “The Scream”, I enjoyed the various landscape paintings that were popular during one of “ism” periods (can’t remember which), featuring massive coniferous forests, glaciers, and harsh Norwegian winters depicted by various Norwegian artists.

Like the Mona Lisa, The Scream had its own special glass casing — glad we stumbled upon it.

We also spent a day walking to and from Oslo’s ski-jumping facility (4.5 miles each way). Oslo hasn’t hosted the Winter Olympics since the 50s, but hosted the ski-jumping world championships in 2011. We took an elevator to the top of the jump, and the views up there were pretty nice. There was also a nice exhibit on the origins of skiing in Norway, with oldest known ski activity taking place almost 5000 years ago.

One of the most interesting parts of the ski exhibit was seeing models of the ski jump, which has been regularly expanded upon since the late 1800s. The current version is the tallest yet, with a seating bowl that can fit 30,000 spectators.

Norway is known for its fjords (islands carved out by glacial movement), and while we weren’t able to see the famous fjords in the north of Norway, we did take a ferry to the main fjord in Oslo. It was a nice little nature-y place, with pretty views of the water and lots of green.

Many little beaches and trails, but unfortunately no good skipping rocks

Next we’re off to Amsterdam, and then Kelsey and I will part ways for 10 or so days before meeting up again in NYC at the end of May. By my calculation, there will be 3 blogs left for me (Amsterdam, Israel, and a wrap-up/top-10s/travel advice piece), so thanks for sticking with me!

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