Matthew Palka

I don’t think any amount of a brute-force, cold wind will get someone to choose to be vulnerable and want their humanity to be deeply seen.

The person will hunch over, resistant. holding even more tightly to their jacket.

The approach to get someone to let the armor go is a warmth that disarms through mirroring, validation, and empathy. Like enough warmth from the sun that recognizes their own story and humanity.

It accepts what has happened to them out of their agency and who they choose to be despite what they faced.

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This is a saying from Simon Cade

Outside the tool is its use partnered to the reality in front of us.

We either use the tool thoughtfully, or it uses us.

This goes for storytelling, ideas, tech, and even our brains.

The moment the tool becomes more important than the kind change it seeks to make and the lives it aims to generously contribute to, we have dishonored ourselves and used it poorly.

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One time in 2017, Hank Green left his laptop on airplane, so he creatively chose to allow the entire Nerdfighter community to make his Amsterdam video for him.

Individuals edited a video together. Groups did. And so did communities.

And I happened to participate and witness the remarkable collaboration of one community Discord hub called Tuataria, delegate and make so much awesome happen.

We time divided up the time-coding and video clips. We made a script for people to choose parts for the voiceover and selected a good handful of editors.

And this all occurred within ten hours, with at least two-hundred people, from sixteen counties, among fifteen different time zones.

Synergy gets more done together than we could ever do apart. We are in countless way no longer limited by proximity when we embrace a we story.

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Combining The Art of Possibility philosophy and Seth’s Godin’s point to merely ship creative work.

Rule #6, the only rule you need to know, is to not take anything too goddamn seriously. It adds a sincere playfulness to everything one does, instead of a desperate all-or-nothing approach that is too willing to sacrifice everything.

Seth points out that instead of “whatever” off the hook shipping careless, terrible-effort creative work, we should merely ship it.

Share it without the excuses that would get us hung up to not sharing it: imposter syndrome narrative, fear, timing, expecting too much, make it personal, want perfect, and many many more.

It’s not meant to betaken seriously or done with an apathetic, detached attitude.

The joy is somewhere in the sincere middle with the courage to generously and playfully contribute again, and again, and again.

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As a kid, I always loved looking out the car window and belly surfing waves into shore.

Everything up close is a blur, staring directly perpendicular out a car window.

The present is where important works and all of life happens, and yet it isn’t the place best to make a last second decision while something is already in motion.

It helps to be just a bit ahead and anticipating when the planned for or unexpected next curveball happens.

The provides us necessary extra slack to adjust to what’s coming.

We’ll seldom catch a wave, a turn, or anything we don’t see coming. By the time we choose to look, it will be too late.

Gaze forward; glance backward.

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Just because you can’t see something doesn’t mean it isn’t there.

The nine dot puzzle’s solution of using four connected lines to cover all dots requires seeing and using the space beyond the expected spot that we think. we cannot cross.

Sometimes the solution is outside our assumptions.

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Matthew Palka

Matthew Palka

Journaler, Investigator, Nerdfighter, Choral Singer