We’re diving deep into what social science scholarship tells us about the reasons behind trust-eroding behavior so we can adapt rather than expect the communities we serve to change for us.

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CUNY’s Carrie Brown chats with JSK Fellow Andre Natta, UF’s Spiro Kiousis, MIT’s David Karger and UF’s April Hines during a conversation on trust convened at the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications in June 2018. (photos by Ryan Jones)

It seems that rarely a week goes by without another report on media trust, a conference is held where this isn’t a critical topic, or we’re faced with yet another reminder of the fallacy of the press’ position as an invulnerable Constitutionally enshrined institution.

That’s why, in partnership with the News Integrity Initiative, the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications launched an exploration to look beyond treating the symptoms of erosion of trust in independent journalism and examine if we can do a bit more to understand the underlying causes.

There are a lot of smart and dedicated people looking for answers and strategies in this realm. There are at least 85 initiatives looking at “fake news,” confusion over the plethora of similarly named but nonetheless well-intentioned efforts, major foundations sponsoring research and commissions and a renewed conversation on the need for better media literacy. Lest we forget the examinations of technological interventions, existing and future. …

About

Matt Sheehan

Managing director @RealGoodCenter & senior lecturer @UFJSchool. Stints @washingtonpost @merrillcollege, COO at a DC media startup + evolving #pubmedia news.

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