The “Wait” Problem Solved: Five Steps to Reduce Procrastination

Seven Procrastination Triggers

  1. Boring
  2. Frustrating
  3. Difficult
  4. Ambiguous
  5. Unstructured
  6. Not intrinsically rewarding (i.e., you don’t find the process fun)
  7. Lacking in personal meaning

How to Combat Procrastination

Five Steps to Reduce Procrastination

  1. Reverse the procrastination triggers. Consider which of Pychyl’s seven procrastination triggers are set off by an activity you’re dreading. Then try to think differently about the task, making the idea of completing it more attractive.
  2. Work within your resistance level. When a task sets off procrastination triggers, we resist doing it. But just how resistant are we? Lower the resistance level like starting with 30 minutes for a project instead of 60.
  3. Do something — anything — to get started. It’s easier to keep going with a task after you’ve overcome the initial hump of starting it in the first place. That’s because the tasks that induce procrastination are rarely as bad as we think.
  4. List the costs of procrastination. This tactic works best when you’re putting off larger tasks. While it’s not worth spending 20 minutes listing the costs of not going for your evening run, listing the costs will significantly help for a task such as saving for retirement.
  5. Disconnect. Our devices offer a cornucopia of distractions, whether it’s email, social media, or texting with friends and family. This is especially difficult as our work becomes more ambiguous and unstructured (two triggers of procrastination).

Why Wait?

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Mavenlink is a transformative software platform for the modern services organization. Learn more at www.mavenlink.com.

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