A running list of the books I read in 2018. In order.

  1. Why We Sleep, Matthew Walker (Recommended)
  2. Blue Ocean Shift, Renee Mauborgne & W. Chan Kim
  3. Unstoppable, Maria Sharapova (Recommended)
  4. Doughnut Economics, Kate Raworth
  5. Reset, Ellen Pao (Recommended)
  6. Evicted, Matthew Desmond (Recommended)
  7. When, Daniel H. Pink
  8. The Last Man Who Knew Everything, David Schwartz (Recommended)
  9. Enlightenment Now, Steven Pinker (Recommended)
  10. The Art of Learning, Josh Waitzkin
  11. Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics, Dan Harris (Recommended)
  12. Way of the Wolf, Jordan Belfort
  13. Deep Thinking, Gary Kasparov (Recommended)
  14. Conspiracy, Ryan Holiday (Highly recommended)
  15. Endure, Alex Hutchinson (Recommended)
  16. The Everything Store, Brad Stone (Recommended)
  17. Brotopia, Emily Chang (Recommended)
  18. Things a Little Bird Told Me, Biz Stone (Recommended)
  19. To Pixar and Beyond, Lawrence Levy (Highly Recommended)
  20. 12 Rules for Life, Jordan B. Peterson
  21. How to American, Jimmy O. Yang (Recommended)
  22. Bad Blood, John Carreyrou (Highly Recommended)
  23. The Third Door, Alex Banayan (Recommended)


This post is part of Month to Master, a 12-month accelerated learning project. For October, my goal is to defeat world champion Magnus Carlsen at a game of chess.

Today is the very last day of my M2M project, and I’m excited to finally share one of the most unexpected parts of this month’s challenge (and the entire project): I had the opportunity to play a game of chess, over the board, with the real Magnus Carlsen last week (November 9) in Hamburg, Germany.

It was an incredibly energizing and enjoyable experience, and I’m really grateful that I had the opportunity. …


This post is part of Month to Master, a 12-month accelerated learning project. For October, my goal is to defeat world champion Magnus Carlsen at a game of chess.

Like with all of my past challenges, today I decided to tally up the total amount of time I spent on this final chess challenge.

Since this challenge was effectively 50% longer than previous challenges, it’s no surprise that I spent a bit longer on it. In particular, over the past six weeks, I committed 34 hours to the pursuit of defeating Magnus.

It turns out that 34 hours isn’t quite enough, but, knowing what I know now, I don’t think it’s too far off. …


This post is part of Month to Master, a 12-month accelerated learning project. For October, my goal is to defeat world champion Magnus Carlsen at a game of chess.

Two days ago, I showed that my algorithmic chess approach is actually workable. It’s still not quite finished, but it does and can work, which is quite exciting.

Right now, my computer is working away on V2 of the algorithm and it’s looking like the performance of this version is going to be better.

I’m going to officially end this challenge and the entire project on Friday, so I’m not sure I’ll be defeating Magnus at chess before then. …


This post is part of Month to Master, a 12-month accelerated learning project. For October, my goal is to defeat world champion Magnus Carlsen at a game of chess.

Yesterday, I finally was able to test my chess algorithm on a recent game I played, and it worked quite well. You can watch the 10-minute video demonstration here.

Today, I dug a little bit deeper into the performance of the algorithm, and the results were still good, although not perfect.

For the first 25 moves or so of any chess game, the algorithm performs more or less perfectly. It identifies good moves as good and bad moves as bad — comfortable carrying its user through the chess game’s opening and some of the middle game. …


This post is part of Month to Master, a 12-month accelerated learning project. For October, my goal is to defeat world champion Magnus Carlsen at a game of chess.

Today, I finished the first version of my chess algorithm, allowing me to play a solid game of chess as a human chess computer. The algorithm is ~94% accurate, which may be sufficient.

Here’s a ten-minute video, where I explain the algorithm and use it to analyze a chess game on Chess.com that I recently played:

(Update: This is the game I played against Magnus, which I later revealed)

I’m excited that it works, and curious to see how much farther I can take it. …


This post is part of Month to Master, a 12-month accelerated learning project. For October, my goal is to defeat world champion Magnus Carlsen at a game of chess.

I just got off a twelve hour flight from Copenhagen back to San Francisco, so I’m going to keep this post pretty short…

While on the plane, since I had nothing better to do, I played around with my chess algorithm, trying to find ways to optimize it and ultimately finding a way to increase its efficiency by 10x.

In other words, my sloppy code was a large contributor to the slow training process over the past couple of days.

Anyway, with the boost in speed, my model is effectively done training now, and I’ve been using it to analyze and play chess games with promising results.

I’ll share more tomorrow…

Read the next post. Read the previous post.

Max Deutsch is an obsessive learner, product builder, guinea pig for Month to Master, and founder at Openmind.

If you want to follow along with Max’s year-long accelerated learning project, make sure to follow this Medium account.


This post is part of Month to Master, a 12-month accelerated learning project. For October, my goal is to defeat world champion Magnus Carlsen at a game of chess.

Today, I spent most of the day exploring Copenhagen by foot. Although it was quite cold, it was a sunny day and I really enjoyed the city.

However, things didn’t go quite as planned…

I left the hotel this morning with a fully charged phone, but, for some reason, perhaps the cold, my phone immediately died after stepping outside.

Rather than heading back to the hotel, I figured I’d continue on without the crutch of Google Maps. I decided to just wander without a specific plan or direction, and then, at the end of my day, just try to find my way back. …


This post is part of Month to Master, a 12-month accelerated learning project. For October, my goal is to defeat world champion Magnus Carlsen at a game of chess.

I’m typically very good at estimating how long doing anything will take me. Whether it’s writing a Medium post, or launching an app, or running errands, or practically anything else, I can usually guess the exact amount of time required plus or minus very little.

However, there are cases, particularly when I have limited experience in the relevant domain, when my time estimation skills fail me.

This month’s challenge is one of those…

About

Max Deutsch

Founder at https://LearnMonthly.com. Blogging at http://MonthToMaster.com. Get in touch at http://max.xyz.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store