Making Abstract Concrete: Streaming

communication design studio: project two

9.18.16

Streaming, in terms of computing, is the transmission and receiving of data. As data moves among a network, streaming allows for it to be a continuos flow of information. Some of the most common forms of streaming are video and audio files. Services such as Netflix, YouTube, Spotify, and Pandora all stream data to users.

“Some broadcasters prefer streaming because it’s hard for most users to save the content and distribute it illegally.”[1]

The encoded files used in streaming are often compressed, minimizing the amount of data being sent over a particular network. This helps in sending and loading video or audio files more quickly. However, if a network is being being inundated with other data a file may buffer so that all of the information has a chance to catch up or load.


9.28.16 — Revision One

Streaming, in terms of computing, is the transmission and receiving of data. As data moves among a network, streaming allows for there to be a constant flow of information. Some of the most common forms of streaming are video and audio files. Services such as Netflix, YouTube, Spotify, and Pandora all stream data to users. Because streaming doesn’t allow users to download and store the data, streaming has become a popular choice for many broadcasting and music companies.

“Some broadcasters prefer streaming because it’s hard for most users to save the content and distribute it illegally.”[1]

Files used in streaming are often encoded, which means the original data has been changed so that external processes can use that data as well. Since streaming uses encoded files, this allows them to be compressed in order to minimize the amount of data being sent over a particular network. This helps in sending and loading video or audio files more quickly. For example, original video files provided by Netflix are encoded and compressed so that users are able to watch them across a variety of devices.

However, if a network is being inundated with other data a file may buffer so that all of the information has a chance to catch up or load. Buffering pre-loads bits of the data being streamed and stores them within an area of your computer’s memory known as the “buffer.” This allows for your system to quickly pull from the stored data in order to complete the streaming process. Buffering can occur in a number of situations, if users are attempting to stream the same data, whether that is music, movies, a live broadcast of a sporting event, or if your internet/bandwidth speed is slow.

Nehal and I drawing each others abstract concepts

10.6.16 — Talking things out

After we took a field trip to listen to Tim Kaine, I shared my actors and relationships surrounding streaming with Allison. She was able to help me work through some of the issues surrounding my description and translating it into the visual form. I also met briefly with Stacie to discuss the issues with my description, she helped direct me to reorder the flow and address some of the repetition that was occurring.


10.9.16 — Description to Script

After last weeks conversation with Allison and Stacie, I’ve begun to work on transforming my description into a script.

We hear the term ‘streaming’ almost everyday — streaming music, streaming movies, stream live TV. But what exactly does this mean? Much like water continuously flowing in a stream, streaming is the continuous flow of data through a network. In order for information to be transmitted and received in streaming, data needs to be broken up in to smaller bits. These small bits of data are also what allows for that continuous flow of information.
However, if a network is being inundated with users, you may encounter the dreaded “buffering.” Buffering allows the information a chance to catch up or load. This is done by pre-loading some of the of the data being streamed and storing it within an area of your computer’s memory known as the “buffer.” This enables your system to quickly pull from the stored data in order to complete the streaming process. If users are attempting to stream the same data at the same time, whether that is music or movies, buffering often occurs.
Some of the most common forms of streaming are video and audio files. Unlike the early days of the internet when you had to wait minutes or hours for the entire file to download, streaming gives users the ability to instantly watch a movie or listen to music. Streaming has become a popular option among services such as Netflix, YouTube, Spotify, and Pandora. Due to the continuous flow of data, and the fact that it has been broken up into smaller bits, users are unable to download a file in it’s entirety, protecting a company’s content. Streaming has also become a popular option for users, allowing quick and instant access to movies, music, and TV programing. And since streaming moves data through the internet, users are able to access information across a number of platforms, including cell phones, laptops, and television sets. Bring on the binge watching— hold the buffering.

10.11.16 — Class time check-in

Right now, I’m feeling better about my script. Overall it still needs a stronger conclusion, but that may unfold as I begin to work on the visual story. Or not. We have been working on storyboarding a few key frames of the story. I want to focus on using a stream as an analogy, the movement and visual representation could be a nice component. I have also been looking at references for visual direction. I’m torn between illustrative style and more graphic design/motion graphic style.

Here are some of the references I have collected thus far:
Source: Nest YouTube

Some of the initial story boarding:


10.12.16 — Looking back at relationships

We broke into groups to go over our initial scripts. It was helpful to get another fresh perspective, I feel that is crucial in trying to make the abstract concrete. In addition, we worked on our story boards and bringing focus back to the relationships we discussed last week.

Here are the key frames we worked in class. The exercise made us rethink some of our storyboards and pull it out to look at our actors and their relationships. I’ll need to go back in and tighten the transitions as well as my script further.

We hear the term ‘streaming’ almost everyday — streaming music, streaming movies, stream live TV. But what exactly does this mean? Streaming is a computing process that allows information to be transmitted and received by means of the internet. It does this by using audio and visual files that are made up of data. Data makes it possible for those large information files to be broken down into smaller bits, known as data packets. Packets allow the little bits of data to travel separately to the same destination. By breaking the data down into packets, the information is able to continuously flow through the internet, much like a water flowing through a stream.
In order for the packets to be collected, sorted, and used — a media player is often utilized. Media players allow your computer to begin using the data packets once enough of them have arrived, unlike traditional downloading, where the user would need to wait for all the data packets to be collected before being able to do anything with them. Also unlike downloading, these data packets are never stored on your computer. The media player will catch the packets and play the file in the correct sequence, once a particular packet is played, it is then deleted, making way for the next packet. Internet-based services use a browser’s cache, or it’s temporary storage, to perform the same tasks of collecting, storing, and playing back packets of data. While streaming is a relatively fast process, it can also be slowed down if there are a multitude of users attempting to stream the same data at the same time, or if your internet connection is slow and unable to keep up with the packets of data. This is known as “buffering.” Buffering will pull and play packets immediately as it waits for the rest of the file to catch up, as more packets reach the destination they are played back.
Despite the occasional buffering, streaming has become a growing trend among users because it gives them the ability to instantly watch a movie or listen to music. Streaming has also become a popular option in the music, film, and tv industries. Due to the continuous flow of data, and the fact that it has been broken up into packets, users are unable to download a file in it’s entirety, protecting their content. Since streaming moves data through the internet, users are able to access information across a number of platforms, including cell phones, laptops, and television sets. So the next time you listen to Pandora, watch a movie on Netflix, or stream a live sporting event, just think of all the packets of data making their way through the internet and reaching you.

10.18.16

Over the past few days, we worked to revise further our scripts and begin to digitally visualize a few of our key frames.

What is streaming? We hear the term almost everyday — streaming music, streaming movies, streaming live TV. But what exactly does this mean? Streaming is a computing process that, thanks to the internet, quickly allows audio and video files to be transmitted to and received by a user. In order to be transmitted and received, the often large files, stored on a websites server, need to be compressed into a smaller files. This is done via a streaming server, which receives the larger file from the web server and breaks them down into smaller bits of data, known as data packets. Packets allow the bits of data to travel separately to the same destination. By breaking the data down into packets, the information is able to continuously flow through the internet, much like a water flowing through a stream.
In order for the packets to be collected, sorted, and used your computer will use any number of means to decode and display the data. This can be done through a traditional media players such as RealTime or QuickTime. However, browsers and websites will often use plugins or Flash applications to display the information in real time. Whatever the means, these allow your computer to begin using the data packets once enough of them have arrived, unlike traditional downloading, where the user would need to wait for all the data packets to be collected before being able to do anything with them. The packets are collected and play the file in the correct sequence, once a particular packet is played, it is then discarded, making way for the next packet. Internet-based services use a browser’s cache, or it’s temporary storage, to perform the same tasks of collecting, storing, and playing back packets of data. While streaming is a relatively fast process, it can also be slowed down if there are a multitude of users attempting to stream the same data at the same time, or if your internet connection is slow and unable to keep up with the packets of data. This is known as “buffering.” Buffering will pull and play packets immediately as it waits for the rest of the file to catch up, as more packets reach the destination they are played back.
Despite the occasional buffering, streaming has become a growing trend among users because it gives them the ability to instantly watch a movie or listen to music. Streaming has also become a popular option in the music, film, and tv industries. Due to the continuous flow of data, and the fact that streaming breaks down audio and video files into packets of data, users are unable to download a file in it’s entirety, protecting their content. Since streaming moves data through the internet, users are able to access information across a number of platforms, including cell phones, laptops, and television sets. So the next time you listen to Pandora, watch a movie on Netflix, or stream a football game on your phone, just think of all the packets of data making their way through the internet and reaching you.
Some exploration of key frames using line and a block of color to represent my actors.

10.19.16 — Revision Threeish

What is streaming? We hear the term almost everyday — streaming music, streaming movies, streaming live TV. But what exactly does this mean? Streaming is a computing process that, thanks to the internet, allows audio and video files to be quickly transmitted to and received by a user. When you stream online, a request for the audio or video file is sent to the website’s server. In order for the file to be transmitted back to the user, it needs to be compressed into a smaller file, this done via a media server. The new server will receive the file from the web server and break it down into smaller bits of data, known as data packets. Packets allow the data to travel separately to the same destination. By breaking the data down into packets, the information is able to continuously flow through the internet and be displayed back to you.
In order for the packets to be collected, sorted, and used, your computer will use any number of means to decode and display the data. This can be done through a traditional media players such as RealTime or QuickTime. However, browsers and websites will often use plugins or Flash applications to display the information in real time. Whatever the means, these allow your computer to begin using the data packets once enough of them have arrived, unlike traditional downloading, where the user would need to wait for all the data packets to be collected before being able to do anything with them. The packets are collected and play the file in the correct sequence, once a particular packet is played, it is then discarded, making way for the next packet. While streaming is a relatively fast process, it can also be slowed down if there are a multitude of users attempting to stream the same data at the same time, or if your internet connection is slow and unable to keep up with the packets of data. This is known as “buffering.” Internet-based services use a browser’s cache, or it’s temporary storage, to perform the same tasks of collecting, storing, and playing back packets of data. Buffering will pull and play stored packets immediately as it waits for the rest of the file to catch up, as more packets reach the destination they are played back.
Despite the occasional buffering, streaming has become a growing trend among users because it gives them the ability to instantly watch a movie or listen to music. Streaming has also become a popular option in the music, film, and tv industries. Due to the continuous flow of data, and the fact that streaming breaks down audio and video files into packets of data, users are unable to download a file in it’s entirety, protecting a company’s content. Since streaming moves data through the internet, users are able to access this information across a number of platforms, including cell phones, laptops, and television sets. So the next time you listen to Pandora, watch a movie on Netflix, or stream a football game on your phone, just think of all the packets of data flowing through the internet to reach you.

10.20.16 — Work Day & Group feedback

We were given more work time in class to focus on digital iterations as well as fine-tuning our scripts. At the end of the period, we broke into groups of three to go over our scripts and visuals together. The timing worked well as we were wrapping up iterations on our script and just beginning to flesh out our digital visuals.

Manya and Eunjung were able to help me identify where I could start to edit down a little. Based on their feedback Thursday, I edited a few lines here and there to streamline the script. I also went back to address a few concerns that they had brought up.

10.23.16 — Version Four

What is streaming? We hear the term almost everyday — streaming music, streaming movies, streaming live TV. But what exactly does this mean? Streaming is a computing process that, thanks to the internet, allows audio and video files to be quickly transmitted to and received by a user. When you stream online, a request for the audio or video file is sent to the website’s server. In order for the file to be transmitted to the user, it needs to be compressed into a smaller size. This is done via a media server. The job of a media server is to receive the file from the web server and break it down into smaller bits of data, known as data packets. Packets allow the data to travel separately to the same destination. By breaking the data down into packets, the information is able to continuously flow through the internet and be displayed back to you.
In order for the packets to be collected, sorted, and played, your computer will use any number of methods to decode and display the data. This can be done through traditional media players such as RealTime or QuickTime. However, browsers and websites will often use plugins or Flash applications to display the information in real time. Unlike traditional downloading, where the user would need to wait for all the data packets to be collected before being able to do anything with them, these tools allow your computer to begin using the data packets once enough of them have arrived. The packets are collected and played in the correct sequence. Once a particular packet is played, it is then discarded, making way for a next packet. While streaming is a relatively fast process, it can also be slowed down if there are a multitude of users attempting to stream the same data at the same time, or if your internet connection is slow and unable to keep up with the packets of data. This is known as “buffering.” Internet-based services use a browser’s cache, or it’s temporary storage, to perform the same tasks of collecting, storing, and playing back packets of data. Buffering will pull and play stored packets immediately as it waits for the rest of the file to catch up, as more packets reach the destination they are played back.
Despite the occasional buffering, streaming has become a growing trend among users because it gives them the ability to instantly watch a movie or listen to music. Since streaming moves data through the internet, users are able to access this information across a number of platforms, including cell phones, laptops, and television sets. So the next time you listen to Pandora, watch a movie on Netflix, or stream a football game on your phone, just think of all the packets of data flowing through the internet to reach you.

10.23 — 10.30 WORK. WORK. WORK.

After Effects is quite the beast. We’ve been working all week on taking our digital key frames and animating them in After Effects. It has been quite immersive, you can get lost for hours, even days, in the tools and tutorials. I also recorded my final script on voice recorder to begin to sync the visuals with the audio.

Final Script:

What is streaming? We hear the term almost everyday — streaming music, streaming movies, streaming live TV. But what exactly does this mean? Streaming is a computing process that, thanks to the internet, allows audio and video files to be quickly transmitted to and received by a user. When you stream online, a request for the audio or video file is sent to the website’s server. In order for the file to be transmitted to the user, it needs to be compressed into a smaller size. This is done via a media server. The job of a media server is to receive the file from the web server and break it down into smaller bits of data, known as data packets. Packets allow the data to travel separately to the same destination. By breaking the data down into packets, the information is able to continuously flow through the internet and be displayed back to you.
In order for the packets to be collected, sorted, and played, your computer will use any number of methods to decode and display the data. Browsers and websites will often use plugins or Flash applications to display the information in real time. Unlike traditional downloading, where the user would need to wait for all the data packets to be collected before being able to do anything with them, these tools allow your computer to begin using the data packets once enough of them have arrived — collecting and playing them in the correct sequence. Once a particular packet is played, it is then discarded, making way for a next packet. While streaming is a relatively fast process, it can also be slowed down if there are a multitude of users attempting to stream the same data at the same time, or if your internet connection is slow and unable to keep up with the packets of data. This is known as “buffering.” Internet-based services will preload packets of data into a reserve of the browser’s storage, known as the buffer. Buffering will pull and play the stored packets immediately as it waits for the rest of the file to catch up, once more packets reach the destination they are played back.
Despite the occasional buffering, streaming has become a growing trend among users because it gives them the ability to instantly watch a movie or listen to music. Since streaming moves data through the internet, users are able to access this information across a number of platforms, including laptops, tablets, cell phones, and even television sets. So the next time you listen to Pandora, watch a movie on Netflix, or stream a football game on your phone, just think of all the packets of data flowing through the internet to reach you.

11.1–11.7: The Final Stretch

I was able to sit with Jiyoung this week and work out some of the transitions that I was having difficulty with, as well as some of the technical issues I was having with After Effects(AE). While I missed out on a class session with Stacie, it was great to be able to sketch and talk out my concerns with Jiyoung. Her feedback and advice helped to steer my project in the right direction. I recorded the audio in the CFA sound booth and then worked the final two days on finessing the AE keyframes to fit as well as filling in the gaps here and there. Hannah and Nurie looked at my video to help me fix some of the smaller issues.

Final Video:

Coming Soon!


Sources:

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