Every Statistically Significant Finding about Gender from the Font Purchasing Habits Survey

It’s that simple! I went through my results of the Font Purchasing Habits Survey and found every statistically significant result that related to gender. I have listed them below. If you haven’t seen the talk I gave about some results of the Font Purchasing Habits Survey at TypeCon 2016, the transcript is available here. Statistically significant means that the difference in responses is mathematically different enough to be meaningful.

Gendered characteristics in fonts:

  • More than 50% of people believe that fonts convey gender.
  • Most people do not self-report that they use gendered words to describe fonts.
  • Women believe that fonts convey different genders significantly more than men.
  • Women identify script fonts with having feminine characteristics significantly more than men.
  • Graphic designers identify script fonts with having feminine characteristics significantly more than type designers.
  • Respondents who do not know a type designer believe that fonts convey different genders significantly more than respondents who do know a type designer.
  • Respondents who do not know a type designer identify script fonts with having feminine characteristics significantly more than respondents who do know a type designer.

Where people shop:

  • Respondents who shop at free font retailers believe that fonts convey different genders significantly more than respondents who do not shop at free font retailers.
  • Respondents who shop at free font retailers identify script fonts with having feminine characteristics more than respondents who do not shop at free font retailers.
  • People who report that they find out about fonts they would like to buy by seeing them in distributor promotional emails identify script fonts with having female characteristics significantly more than people who do not.

Perception of free fonts:

  • Women agree significantly more than men that when one font (that is part of a larger family) is free, they are more inclined to purchase the entire typeface family.
  • Men agree significantly more than women that when they download a free font, they don’t end up using it.
  • Women agree more than men that most of the fonts that they download are lawfully free fonts.

Other components of a font purchase:

  • Women check out promotional lists first when shopping for fonts significantly more than men.
  • Men consider webfont usage and licensing when making recommendations for clients significantly more than women do.
  • Women are more likely than men to buy a font if they see it used on hypothetical products in marketing promotions created by type designers.
  • Men are more likely than women to purchase a font if they see it has won an award.
  • Men are willing to spend more on fonts than women, except for script typeface families.

Discounts

Men and women report different discounts needed to buy a font that they like but do not need.

There is no statistically significant difference in opinion between men and women for the following statements:

  • “There are a few foundries that are my go-to for fonts. I check their fonts first to see if they have what I need before browsing.” Both groups highly agree with this statement.
  • “I am more inclined to purchase a font with a high glyph count over a font that has a lower glyph count.” Both groups agree with this statement
  • “I have positive feelings about font subscription service plans.” Both groups feel neutral about this statement.
  • “I usually think about a font for a while before purchasing it.” Both groups highly agree with this statement.
  • “I would like it if someone gave me a font as a gift instead of giving me a traditional present.” Both groups agree with this statement.

The Font Purchasing Habits Survey was created, released, & analyzed before I became an employee of Monotype. The views and opinions expressed in this article are my own and are not necessarily those of Monotype.