The potential of invisible design to impact business

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Image from @darkjet

Many organisations today, from startups to governments, are investing in customer experience (CX) and user experience (UX) for their success, bringing more human-centred design capabilities to increase the business relevance of their projects for clients. And this is happening thanks to a growing number of organisations struggling to meet customers’ expectations and delivering a consistent quality of service across different channels, affirms Marzia Aricò in this article.

“Design is trending in business. …


User Experience writing is more than content design. It’s content strategy for products.

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“As a writer who stumbled into UX one day many years ago, I was understandably excited; finally, organizations are realizing that copywriting shouldn’t only land on the marketing team’s desk” — UX Booth

I’ve been spending the past few months curious about this emerging role of UX writer because I always liked to write and, as a UX Designer, I was wondering how I could do copywriting for products that could really impact user experience. …


A few months ago I posted an article about a 2-day Design Sprint. In this event, our Sprint team successfully achieved to establish the long and short term goals for the project, finishing the last session with a tangible storyboard for our main user journey.

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Ongoing Design Sprint session at AB Tasty in Paris, February 2019

After this Sprint session, the prototype was built within a few weeks time to be tested and implemented. But, instead of rolling-out the solution to beta testers, we decided to iterate a little bit more with internal customer success managers in order to validate our hypotheses. …


Onboarding is the process of helping new users understand and experience how your product is going to help them achieve their goal.

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Welcome aboard! (Image)

Jory MacKay asserts that onboarding is all about proving to your users that your product is the solution to the problem they are looking for. That’s why they found you in the first place, right? But if you can’t do that quickly, users are going to leave. And how to avoid that?

Tell a story.

Every killer onboarding starts with a story.

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It is tremendously helpful to think of onboarding not in terms of activating features, but in terms of how our product makes its users successful. We earn their engagement by making them better people, not simply by making a better product. …


Focus on the problem framing. Leave the prototype and test phases for later (if you really HAVE to).

Design Sprint is a process of framing the right problem, generating tangible solutions, prototyping and testing them with real users in a period of 5 intense days of work. But for our new project at AB Tasty we only had 2 days available to gather the sprint team in a room — and we did it! 💪🏽

As the original definition goes,

“Design Sprint is a five-day process for answering critical business questions through design, prototyping, and testing ideas with customers”

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This process became notorious within the Design community back in 2014 when Jake Knapp, from Google Ventures, introduced it in his book called Sprint: How to solve big problems and test new ideas in just five ideas. Knapp tells the world all about his secret recipe to run a successful sprint, regardless of the problem you want to solve and which kind of business you are running. The methodology is already endorsed by big brands such as Slack and Airbnb, but every person and every company can benefit from running a Design Sprint— all you need is a challenge seeking for resolution. …


If your solutions are not good enough, maybe you’re just focusing on the wrong problems

I wrote an article earlier this year on how Design Thinking methodology can help you create and validate your design hypothesis within your product team. In summary, the process of generating and testing good design propositions relies heavily on the problem space: how well you know your audience and how clear are the pain points and main blockers your users are facing on their way towards small and big successes. This means that the solution to a problem depends on how we frame the problem.

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The Problem / Solution spaces

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The Double Diamond diagram by Ari Tanninen

Our problem statement will define the direction we take on the solution space. In this case, no matter how dedicated and efficient is your process in developing the new solution, the results will never be satisfactory if we are addressing the wrong problem. …


A quick guide on how to materialize your design ideas

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I believe most of you are familiar with the Design Thinking methodology (if not, you can easily Google it). However, there is a common misconception that design thinking is new. No. Throughout history, good designers have applied a human-centric creative process to build meaningful and effective solutions. But in order for this approach to be adopted across large organizations, it needed to be standardized as a formal framework. So Design Thinking was born as a methodology of applying the creative design process to traditional business problems.

According to the Nielsen Norman Group, the Design Thinking framework follows an overall flow of three main categories: understand, explore and materialize. Within these larger buckets fall the 6 phases: empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test, and implement. …


A quick guide on how to materialize your design ideas

Image for post
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I believe most of you are familiar with the Design Thinking methodology (if not, you can easily Google it). However, there is a common misconception that design thinking is new. No. Throughout history, good designers have applied a human-centric creative process to build meaningful and effective solutions. But in order for this approach to be adopted across large organizations, it needed to be standardized as a formal framework. So design thinking was born as a methodology of applying the creative design process to traditional business problems.

According to the Nielsen Norman Group, the Design Thinking framework follows an overall flow of three main categories: understand, explore and materialize. Within these larger buckets fall the 6 phases: empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test, and implement. …


A discussion about the significant role of alternative media in the construction and preservation of national/cultural identities

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Brazilian demonstrators take over the National Congress building during the wave protests in June 2013. Source: Mídia NINJA.

It is obvious for some people that quite often the national media — or mainstream media — does not represent the majority of the population that they are addressing. In such cases, a significant part of the audience is subjected to a media system fuelled by commercial demands and political interests that don’t reflect their demands nor dialogue with their own reality. We can see that a tendency towards a cultural homogenisation is greater in this context whereas the media is responsible for the process of building a ‘national’ image. …


While working in a start-up in Germany, I had an interesting interaction once with a client’s feedback on a mobile application project, which made me think (even more) about my social responsibility as a designer.

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Source: Unsplash.com — rawpixel.com

A prototype was handed over to the stakeholder which contained a picture of a black man as a persona. Of course, this was an intentional provocation on my side because I noticed that the client has been using only pictures of white and blond people for the use cases of their product. Despite the disturbance this could cause — and I was secretly hoping this would happen — , I was expecting that the prototype would be assessed based on other relevant aspects such as technical feasibility, content and UI elements. Moreover, I usually expect that companies in the design and tech industries are willing to promote their corporate identities as inclusive institutions because it’s “cool” and modern. …

About

Bettina D'ávila

Product Designer, drummer and beer lover. I enjoy exploring a range of opportunities involving new media and innovation for cultural and social empowerment.

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