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I often hear a note of skepticism when I speak to researchers about remote, unmoderated research tools. “Face to face research is essential for us. It’s the heart of human-centered design!” they might say. I was once like this — passionate about research and a little defensive about doing anything other than than the gold standard.

Maybe you’d be defensive too, if, like many researchers and designers, you were worried about your work being diminished, de-scoped or de-funded. In particular, any suggestion to cut research back can trigger a knee-jerk response. …


For our enterprise customers, adding any new tool to their toolkit can incur a fair amount of red tape. From security audits to police checks to custom trainings and demos, we’re working on supporting bigger companies in 2021.

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Many of the larger companies that come to us have different needs to the smaller teams or individuals that use UsabilityHub. One of those requirements is the ability to control how their team authenticates with external providers.

For bigger teams, especially now with the prevalence of working from home, having individual team members set their own passwords is a business risk and goes against established IT and security protocol. In the past, this has even prevented some customers from being able to use UsabilityHub at all.

Google SSO & custom password standards

We’ve recently made some changes to help with this. In 2020, we announced the…


We’ve got big plans and we’ll need some more hands on deck to deliver them.

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2020 was a strange year, and in many ways, 2021 may be much the same — the difference is, we’ve adjusted now and we’re ready for it this time round. For us at UsabilityHub, we spent 2020 learning, strategizing and maturing our processes, culminating in an exciting annual planning in Q4. The result of that planning is an ambitious roadmap and matching hiring plan, putting us on track for a year of growth and innovation in 2021.

Where we’re going

UsabilityHub has helped designers test their ideas with real people since 2011 — that’s ten years ago. …


We’re proud to announce a big addition to UsabilityHub today: Logic.

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Up until now, UsabilityHub tests have been a one size fits all affair. With Logic, you can show participants questions based on previous responses, which allows you to get more precise with your test design, and dig deeper into participants’ answers.

Hide/show logic

Logic utilizes display logic. By default, all participants will see all questions/sections that don’t have any conditions applied. Their test experience changes on a per question/section basis when Logic is applied. Once a participant has answered a question/section with Logic enabled, they are shown the next part of the test the same as everyone else.

There are various different types of logic used on other research platforms, but we decided to go with display logic keep things simple.

Get crafty with your follow-ups

One of the cool features of Logic is that you can apply conditions to your follow-up questions. For example, in this test…


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We want you to do more research and make research more valuable in your organization. By making it fast, affordable and easy to run tests on UsabilityHub, we’ve made it easier to do research — but how about sharing those findings?

Today we’re adding some more ways for you to share your research findings from UsabilityHub. You can now quickly and easily export heat maps, click maps and word clouds as PNG images with the click of a button.

This means that results from your Click tests, Navigation tests and short and long text Questions can now be exported as images for you to share with colleagues. …


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We’re making signing up to UsabilityHub easier than ever by allowing you to sign up using your existing Google account.

We’re always looking for ways to make UsabilityHub easier to use, including how to make it easier to access. Our mission is to democratize user experience research, and to do that, it should be easy to sign up and create an account to start testing your designs right away.

We also know that it can be a pain to create and safely store passwords for the various different tools we now use daily as part of our work. If anything, those tools are increasing as many of has shifted to working from home or with more distributed/online-only teams.

So we’ve…


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We’ve made it easier to get started with UsabilityHub with a collection of simple templates.

We’ve improved your first few moments getting to know UsabilityHub by providing some key information you need to start doing UX research and getting insights about designs.

Getting up to speed with a new piece of software can be daunting even for the most savvy power users. It’s like moving in to a new house and remembering which drawer your cutlery is in now — it takes a little time to feel natural.

We saw that many people didn’t realize all the cool things that UsabilityHub can do — maybe signing up to do a five second test but never…


The clever folks over at User Interviews have put together an updated version of their UX Research Tools Map and UsabilityHub is one of the tools featured. We took a look at the map and learned a lot about design research in 2020.

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1. The tooling for design research in 2020 is varied, powerful and very exciting

The first thing to say about this diagram is how impressive it is. Not only because the excellent and very hard work that has gone in to creating it, but the amount of tools now available to UX researchers in 2020.

We’ve come a long way. All of our favourite tools are on this map, including Miro, Dovetail, Airtable, Productboard, Notion, Fullstory, Balsamiq and Figma. Seeing all their competitors laid out makes it so clear that UX designers are hungry for tools and that there is opportunity for new products all the time.

We like to think of ourselves as…


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For the enlightened product designers among us, usability testing’s immense value is common knowledge. So, why is it that so many of us seem to be failing to sell that fact internally?

I’m a software developer, with a keen interest in product development. That’s caused me to go outside my comfort zone and explore the deeper issues affecting the tools I build every day. I’ve learned a lot in my journey into Usability Testing, and found that organisational buy-in is the hardest part about using modern usability techniques.

This article isn’t about the effectiveness or importance of such usability techniques. Enough has already been said on the subject. Instead, I’m going talk about what needs to be to done to get the necessary traction in your organisation. …


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At UsabilityHub, we have gone out of our way to extend generosity in these uncertain times. Continuing along those lines, we’re hiring a Customer support manager to help our team grow. We’re looking for a Customer Support Manager to lead our team of Support Specialists in providing exceptional customer and user support for both our research and participant panel SaaS products.

Our support team are located across the globe to ensure we provide timely support to our international customer base. We’re looking for a manager who has experience building, leading, and running a globally distributed team that cares deeply about the success of its customers. The support team provides support for SaaS products and collaborates closely with the product, sales and operations teams.

This role requires strong leadership, time-management and communication skills. Not only will you be directly responsible for keeping UsabilityHub’s customers happy and productive, you will have a team of talented individuals looking for your guidance to help them…

Milly Schmidt

Director of product building design research tools at UsabilityHub.

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