Flywheeling

via Giphy

“I would not waste my life in friction when it could be turned into momentum.” ~ Frances Willard

It’s a humbling thing to be writing blog posts and a novel that may never be read by more than a few friends. (Hello friends! *waves*)

Is it worth it? To sacrifice the time I otherwise would have spent writing with loved ones? Gardening? Or the housework? Or bingewatching Netflix?

I have to remind myself, that my writing efforts are feeding a flywheel.

That nifty rotating mechanical device that harvests and dispenses force.

But, a flywheel has a moment of inertia. You have to really put a lot of effort to get the flywheel moving from standstill, to rotation.

At first, it’s exhausting. It may take a few tries to get it moving. Neglect to apply that effort regularly and the flywheel will just grind to a halt.

Eventually, a commitment to apply consistent action returns a breakthrough.

A win, a result, an encouraging event.

You feel more motivated, reenergised. The force you apply is accelerating with gathered momentum. The wheel is getting easier to spin. The progress becomes more stable. Energy gets stored in reserve.

So all these posts which go unread help me to polish my craft, work through my ideas and hopefully get a bit better each day. It’s not a waste.

Perhaps the flywheel effect is why people tend to believe in overnight success. Because, most don’t see all that dedicated striving. Instead, they notice the moment inertia finally kicks in and accumulated effort finally manifests the inevitable opportunity. Work is mistaken for luck.

The greater tragedy would be to give up, not realising that starting the flywheel is the part that requires greatest determination.

And just expect that it’s going to be difficult, before it gets easier.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.