We’re doing people an incredible disservice by telling them they should seek, and pursue, what they love. People usually can’t differentiate what they really love and what they love the idea of.
You’re Not Meant To Do What You Love. You’re Meant To Do What You’re Good At.
Brianna Wiest
5.4K

If children were educated with a respect for their innate passions, I suspect this differentiation gap would not exist. A huge part of passion based learning is developing metacognitive skills, which help children not only identify strengths and weaknesses but also how it feels when they doing their best work and how to get back to that point in a variety of circumstances. Children grow a core skills set that isn’t defined by/restricted to a single professional field, and the confidence that goes with knowing they can be successful in multiple situations. Obviously specialized professional and content knowledge has its place, but overemphasizing this vs soft and what are considered “21st century” skills create people you’ve described in this piece, derailed by perceived failure in an area they supposedly “love.”

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