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If you bought a new DSLR camera in the last few years, you probably noticed that most of them offered the same resolution: 24 megapixels. One reason why is that many different camera manufacturers purchase their camera sensors from a common supplier.

A camera company with expertise rooted in the film era may understand optics and ergonomics but can’t be assumed to have expertise manufacturing cutting-edge digital sensors. In this way, the supplier’s digital sensor acts as a technology platform around which other companies can build products. …


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Whether in the tech press or analyst reports, it became more common in 2018 to see the words “API” and “security” — or worse, “API” and “breach” — together in the same headline.

APIs (application programming interfaces) are not only the connective tissue between applications, systems, and data, but also the mechanisms that allow developers to leverage and reuse these digital assets for new purposes. APIs factor into almost every digital use case, and their role in security news isn’t an intrinsic flaw in APIs any more than vaults are categorically flawed simply because some of them have been cracked.


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Somewhere, a banker sits in his office, shoulders slumped, looking at the newest report about how many consumers have turned to digital-only finance — and how many more branches his bank will need to close.

Or maybe the report includes the newest numbers about how few millennial customers the bank has. Perhaps it’s about how much market share they’ve lost to Stripe or Mint or Fundbox or Plaid or some fintech he’s never even heard of before. It might be all of these things at once. …


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Microservices-based architectures continue to be one of the hottest topics in enterprise IT, and as hype has given way to real-world use, the realities and challenges of microservices have become more sharply defined. Namely, enterprises are finding that microservices can deliver the advantages their proponents promise but that doing microservices well is often devilishly complicated.

Single-function, fine-grained services that can be independently deployed and replaced, microservices differ from legacy approaches, such as hard-to-update monolithic applications in which many functions are tightly coded together. …


How Three Companies are Using Microservices to Drive Results

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Technologies are often described in terms of hype cycles and reality distortion fields — and sometimes with good reason, as some heralded technologies have yet to really pan out (looking at you, 3D TVs) while others have taken decades of starts and stops to achieve widely useful real world use cases (welcome to renewed relevance, neural networks!).

For many companies, it might be hard to judge just where microservices-based architectures currently fall on the hype continuum. Because they offer small, lightweight snippets of functionality that can be independently deployed, microservices have…


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The goal of almost every enterprise, no matter the industry, is to deliver delightful customer experiences that fuel business growth. Though each industry and organization’s profits rely on different mixes of products and services, one underlying link unites virtually all of them: to keep pace with changing customer demands, a business needs IT agility — that is, it needs the ability to connect data, applications, and systems to create new digital experiences and products.

How do companies do this? They use application programming interfaces (APIs).

APIs allow software to talk to other software — which means they can enable developers…


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Most enterprise leaders know digital transformation is a big deal — after all, aggregately, they’re now investing trillions of dollars¹ per year on transformation endeavors.

But the spending hasn’t always led to the results businesses have been looking for. It certainly hasn’t stopped stock market shock waves from rippling through entire industries when, say, Amazon shows interest in a new area.

Worse, according to research firm IDC, 59 percent of enterprises are in a state of “digital impasse.”² Research firms such as Forrester have attributed³ these sorts of struggles to enterprises’ somewhat scattershot approach, such as transformation efforts initiated among…


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Until recently, one of my favorite places to see a movie was this theater in Cupertino, California — not because it had the area’s biggest screens, best seats, or most ear-shattering speakers, per se (though all of those were fine), but because it resided in a dead mall: 1 million+ square feet of real estate that, aside from the theater and an ice cream shop, was largely, eerily unoccupied.

It was a great place to beat the crowds because, well, often there were fewer of them — but alas, the theater closed earlier this year, as the mall began moving…


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Virtually every business feels the pressure to up its digital game. Research firm IDC, for example, anticipates global digital transformation spending will reach $1.7 trillion¹ by the end of 2019, a 42 percent increase from last year’s already large numbers.

But “being digital” is easier said than done: IDC also found that last year, three-fifths of companies found themselves at a “digital impasse,”² with transformation efforts commanding growing budgets but producing inconsistent results.

In this challenging environment, it may be beneficial to highlight some of the areas in which enterprises are making solid progress. …


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More and more CEOs are saying “digital” is at the core of their strategies — not surprising, since more and more CEOs are also facing pressure from their boards to turn technology investments into business results.

But even if company leaders understand that digital transformation is an imperative, many of them continue to hit detours, roadblocks, and delays as they attempt to navigate the path from vision to execution. These setbacks can be costly — at best. In the worst cases, they can have significant consequences, even reducing long-standing industry giants into cautionary footnotes.

Luckily, these missteps fall into identifiable…

Michael Endler

Editorial at Google

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