Mette Harrison
Oct 15, 2019 · 3 min read

The Moment of Revelation

If you, like me, have been a little confused or pained by the whiplash caused by the spate of changes since Russell M. Nelson has become prophet of the Mormon church (Yes, I still call it that) in which no one who has asked for these changes beforehand was acknowledged as part of the conversation, well, you just don’t understand. Anyone who asked for the change before it was declared revelation from God were wrong.

No, they didn’t foresee the future.

No, God didn’t reveal something to them before the prophet.

No, they didn’t lay the groundwork by asking questions and being excommunicated.

The moment the prophet speaks for God from the pulpit to declare these changes is the moment God wanted them changed. Not one second before. Not even if the prophet was working behind the scenes to prepare. No, that very moment of public announcement was what God wanted.

Blacks were kept from temples and told they were lesser persons in the church, that they wouldn’t get to the celestial kingdom or be allowed to be in priesthood leadership positions until that moment in 1978 when everything changed. Anyone who thought it should change before that was wrong. Anyone who struggled with the change afterward — also wrong.

When the prophet speaks, the church doesn’t just obey. The members don’t just follow. They swap out their old brains with a new brain. And their old hearts with new hearts.

Women asking to speak in General Conference before the prophet decided to do it all on his own without anyone whispering in his ear? They were wrong, disgusting, ambitious, unfeminine, and needing repentance. The fact that the prophet happened to do what they thought was right — coincidence. It doesn’t make them right afterward. They were still always, always wrong.

Because if God wants changes in the church, God speaks to the prophet. The prophet isn’t able to be delayed in his capacity to listen. The prophet doesn’t hear anyone but God. And so if anyone else thinks they are speaking to God about problems in the church, they are evil and to be shunned.

Women becoming witnesses? The wording of temple covenants in the endowment ceremony changed to be less sexist? Women missionaries being able to wear pants? Missionaries calling parents more often? Two hour church? The gospel topics essays?

All directly from God to the prophet at the very moment that God wished it to be so. Because God is God. How could you doubt that? How dare you suggest that God isn’t behind the church at every step? How dare you imply that God might speak to someone other than the prophet? Or that the prophet might be blind to the times and prejudiced or limited in any way?

As for the supposed reversal of the policy of exclusion for LGBT members in November of 2015, it was never a reversal. Because how could the prophet reverse what God had declared pure revelation intended to show love for the children? It was a minor adjustment, a policy change that has nothing to do with doctrine, which as always will remain eternal.

Any other clarifications necessary? I should hope not. Just go back and read what the prophet has said. That’s all that you need to know.

Mette Harrison

Written by

Author of The Bishop’s Wife mystery series, The Mormon Sabbatical Podcast, Princeton PhD, fiction editor at Exponent II, autist, she/her

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