On the Merits of Bug Tracking

Yes, I wrote a whole blog post about bugs. Bugs are boring and managing bugs can be mind-numbing. However, all software has bugs and managing those bugs helps you understand the health and quality of your software, helps you understand the risk associated with new features, and helps you figure out if you’re ready to ship or not.

At some point in our careers, developers have a desire to fix all bugs before releasing. This might work for small projects or in situations where you don’t have a lot of testing. For larger projects, especially as projects mature, it’s just not possible to fix all the bugs before releasing a new version, so it’s time to manage your backlog. Creating good bugs helps reduce the time it takes to manage and fix bugs.

  • Summary — Be explicit and contextual. This is the text that shows up in bug lists. Something too vague, like “Crash when posting” will require people to always open the details to figure out the context.
  • Steps to reproduce — Be clear and precise. What was the expected behavior vs actual behavior? Does it happen all the time or is it intermittent and hard to reproduce?
  • Description — Is the bug a crash, broken behavior, performance or regression? Make sure you add these details. For UI related issues, add a screenshot or video. Can you provide a minimal test case for the issue?

You can’t fix them all, so it’s time to triage. Bug debt contributes to the risk of shipping, so you need to manage the set of bugs like many other aspects of your development process. Don’t be frightened by a large quantity of bugs in your backlog. It just means people are testing your software, which is a good thing.

Bug triage is the process of going through the list to find bugs that need assistance, escalation, or follow-up. This is usually done in a group, but sometimes individually to clean incoming bugs. Through this process the nastiest, riskiest bugs are identified.

  • Prioritize — Don’t guess. Use a decision tree, or some other system, to determine a real priority.
  • Estimate — Don’t guess. If it’s too hard to figure out, you should break the work up into smaller tasks. Link those sub-tasks back to the original bug.
  • Adjust — Bug metadata is not set in stone. Situations change over time, so can the bug priority.

Bugs have their own social networks. New code always spawns bugs so link those regressions back to the source feature or fix. Link duplicates back to the original issue. Sometimes those are not 100% duplicates and it’s good to verify all the duplicates are really fixed. Link code landings back to bugs. Code archeology is a real thing so make it easier by creating a map of bugs to code. You should be able to start with a line of code and easily find out why/when it was added. You should also be able to start with a bug and find the code used to fix the issue.

The bug metadata should be factual, but separate from the decision to ship. Don’t lower a bug priority just to make the decision to ship easier for someone else. Let those people own the decision to ship with a known level of quality.

Triage helps keep bug status up to date, which is how real-time roadmaps are created. In a time-oriented release schedule, release roadmaps can change because some features aren’t ready to ship. When the enough code lands and regressions that need to be fixed are fixed, a feature is ready to ship. Triaging bugs and managing feature status frequently allows you to be proactive about changes in roadmaps, not reactive.


Originally published at stark raving finkle.